Recall Of Gorgonzola Cheese Expands

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Three more recalls involving Gorgonzola Cheese have been issued in the past two weeks.  Here are the involved recalls per the CFIA.

Health Hazard Alert – Certain Ballarini brand Gorgonzola cheese may contain Listeria monocytogenes

Recall / advisory date:
August 2, 2013
Reason for recall / advisory:
Microbiological – Listeria
Hazard classification:
Class 1
Company / Firm:
Jan K Overweel Ltd.
Distribution:
National
Extent of the distribution:
Retail
Reference number:
8200
 

Advisory details

Ottawa, August 2, 2013 – The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and Jan K Overweel Ltd. are warning the public not to consume the Ballarini brand Gorgonzola cheese products described below because the products may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes.

Also affected by this alert are the below products which may have been sold in smaller packages, cut and wrapped by some retailers. Consumers are advised to contact the retailer to determine if they have the affected products.

There have been no reported illnesses associated with the consumption of these products.

The importer, Jan K Overweel Ltd., Woodbridge, ON, is voluntarily recalling the affected products from the marketplace. The CFIA is monitoring the effectiveness of the recall.

Affected products

Brand Name Common Name Size Codes(s) on Product UPC
Ballarini Gorgonzola D.O.P. Cremaverde 4 x 1.5 kg (Random weight) Code: ZAN03012,
Best Before: 2013/10/17
Best Before: 2013/11/16
Starts with
2724118
Ballarini Gorgonzola Dolce DOP 150 g Code: BAL10200,
Best Before: 2013/09/04
Best Before: 2013/10/08
8021398301540

More information

For more information, consumers and industry can contact:

Jan K Overweel Ltd. at 905-850-9010

Food contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes may not look or smell spoiled. Consumption of food contaminated with this bacteria may cause listeriosis, a foodborne illness. Listeriosis can cause high fever, severe headache, neck stiffness and nausea. Pregnant women, the elderly and people with weakened immune systems are particularly at risk. Infected pregnant women may experience only a mild, flu-like illness, however, infections during pregnancy can lead to premature delivery, infection of the newborn, or even stillbirth. 

Ballarini - Gorgonzola D.O.P. CremaverdeBallarini - Gorgonzola D.O.P. Cremaverde - label
Ballarini - Gorgonzola  Dolce DOPBallarini - Gorgonzola  Dolce DOP - label

Media enquiries

Jan K Overweel Ltd.
905-850-9010

Updated Health Hazard Alert – Certain Igor brand Gorgonzola Cheese may contain Listeria monocytogenes

Recall / advisory date:
July 30, 2013
Reason for recall / advisory:
Microbiological – Listeria
Hazard classification:
Class 1
Company / Firm:
Berchicci Importing Ltd.
Distribution:
Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, May be National, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Quebec, Saskatchewan
Extent of the distribution:
Retail
Reference number:
8199
Advisory details
Ottawa, July 30, 2013 – The public warning issued on July 30, 2013 has been updated to include additional products.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and Berchicci Importing Ltd. are warning the public not to consume the Igor brand Gorgonzola Cheese described below because the products may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes.

Also affected by this alert are the products below which may have been sold in smaller packages, cut and wrapped by some retailers. Consumers are advised to contact the retailer to determine if they have the affected products.

These products have been distributed in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec and Nova Scotia. However, they may have been distributed in other provinces.

There have been no reported illnesses associated with the consumption of these products.

The importer, Berchicci Importing Ltd., Montreal, Quebec, is voluntarily recalling the affected products from the marketplace. TheCFIA is monitoring the effectiveness of the recall.

All lot codes and Best Before dates of the following Igor brand Gorgonzola cheese, product of Italy, are affected by this alert.

Affected products

Brand Name Common Name Size UPC
Igor “Gorgonzola Dolce” 1.5 kg 2443880 XXXXX*
* variable
Igor “Gorgonzola Piccante” 1.5 kg 2219109 XXXXX*
* variable
Igor “Gorgonzola Dolce DOP” 200 g 8 021398 256802

More information

Food contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes may not look or smell spoiled. Consumption of food contaminated with this bacteria may cause listeriosis, a foodborne illness. Listeriosis can cause high fever, severe headache, neck stiffness and nausea. Pregnant women, the elderly and people with weakened immune systems are particularly at risk. Infected pregnant women may experience only a mild, flu-like illness, however, infections during pregnancy can lead to premature delivery, infection of the newborn, or even stillbirth.

Igor - Gorgonzola Dolce, 1.5 kilogramIgor - Gorgonzola Dolce DOP, 200 gram

Igor - Gorgonzola Dolce DOP, 200 gram - label

Updated Health Hazard Alert – Certain Igor brand Gorgonzola Cheese may contain Listeria monocytogenes

Recall / advisory date:
July 30, 2013
Reason for recall / advisory:
Microbiological – Listeria
Hazard classification:
Class 1
Company / Firm:
Agropur
Distribution:
Alberta, May be National, New Brunswick, Ontario, Quebec
Extent of the distribution:
Retail
Reference number:
8198

Advisory details

Ottawa, July 30, 2013 – The public warning issued on July 18, 2013 has been updated to include an additional product.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and Agropur are warning the public not to consume the Igor brand Gorgonzola Cheese described below because the product may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes.

Also affected by this alert is the product below which may have been sold in smaller packages, cut and wrapped by some retailers. Consumers are advised to contact the retailer to determine if they have the affected product.

This product was distributed in Quebec, Ontario, Alberta and New Brunswick. However, it may have been distributed in other provinces.

There have been no reported illnesses associated with the consumption of this product.

The importer, Agropur, St-Hubert, Quebec, is voluntarily recalling the affected product from the marketplace. The CFIA is monitoring the effectiveness of the recall.

All lot codes and Best Before dates of the following Igor brand Gorgonzola cheese, product of Italy, are affected by this alert.

Affected products

Brand Name Common Name Size UPC
Igor Gorgonzola Igorcreme DOP 1/8 1.5 kg 2190010 014222

More information

For more information, consumers and industry can contact:

Agropur Cheese and Ingredients Division
Fine Cheese Business Unit
Customer service: 1-450-443-4838 or 1-800-668-0806

Food contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes may not look or smell spoiled. Consumption of food contaminated with this bacteria may cause listeriosis, a foodborne illness. Listeriosis can cause high fever, severe headache, neck stiffness and nausea. Pregnant women, the elderly and people with weakened immune systems are particularly at risk. Infected pregnant women may experience only a mild, flu-like illness, however, infections during pregnancy can lead to premature delivery, infection of the newborn, or even stillbirth.

 

 Igor - Gorgonzola IgorcremeGorgonzola Igorcreme - label

HACCPCanada advocates and mandates HACCP System Certification; with an emphasis on providing Food Safety Confidence to the Consumer. We are a Certifying Body (an independent & impartial national organization which evaluates and verifies HACCP systems) and have succeeded in furnishing an economical, effective and expedient Certification Process for the Retail Food Supply Chain including Non-Registered Manufacturing, Warehousing, Logistics, Restaurants and Retail Food Outlets.

Contact us to achieve Certification from HACCPCanada, today!

CFIA Reinstates Operations at St. Ann’s Foods Inc (Est. 287)

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Note : Effective April 26, 2013, Establishment 287, St. Ann’s Foods Inc., was allowed to resume operations under intensified CFIAinspection.

February 8, 2013, Ottawa: The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has suspended the operating license of Establishment 287,St. Ann’s Foods Inc., a beef slaughter plant located in St. Ann’s, Ontario, effective February 7, 2013.

The company has failed to correct deficiencies in hygienic practices that were previously identified through CFIA inspections. Although St. Ann’s Foods Inc. presented an acceptable action plan to the CFIA that would have corrected these deficiencies, they have been unable to demonstrate consistent or full implementation of the corrective measures within the required timeframe and this has resulted in the licence suspension. The licence suspension is in line with CFIA‘s first priority – the health and safety of Canadian consumers.

There are no food recalls associated with this suspension and no reported illnesses.

St. Ann’s Foods Inc. is prohibited from operating this facility until they have fully implemented the necessary corrective actions and the CFIA is fully confident in the establishment’s ongoing capacity to effectively manage food safety risks.

The safety of Canadian consumers is the CFIA‘s top priority and the Agency continues to work diligently to ensure Canada’s food safety system remains effective.

HACCPCanada advocates and mandates HACCP System Certification; with an emphasis on providing Food Safety Confidence to the Consumer. We are a Third-Party Auditor and a Certifying Body (an independent & impartial national organization which evaluates and verifies HACCP systems) and have succeeded in furnishing an economical, effective and expedient Certification Process for the Retail Food Supply Chain including Non-Registered Manufacturing, Warehousing, Logistics, Restaurants and Retail Food Outlets.

Contact us to achieve Certification from HACCPCanada, today!

 

 

Walnuts Recalled From Produce Depot in Ottawa

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Consumer Advisory – Bulk in-shell walnuts from Produce Depot (Bank St., Ottawa) may contain Salmonella bacteria

Recall date:
March 15, 2013
Reason for recall:
Microbiological – Salmonella
Hazard classification:
Recalling Firm:
Produce Depot
Distribution:
Ontario
Extent of the distribution:
Consumer

Advisory details

Ottawa, March 15, 2013 – The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is warning the public not to consume the walnuts described below because they may be contaminated with Salmonella.

The affected walnuts were sold in bulk from Produce Depot, 2446 Bank St., Ottawa, ON between February 26 and March 15, 2013, inclusive.

There have been no reported illnesses associated with the consumption of this product.

More information

Food contaminated with Salmonella may not look or smell spoiled. Consumption of food contaminated with these bacteria may cause salmonellosis, a foodborne illness. In young children, the elderly and people with weakened immune systems, salmonellosis may cause serious and sometimes deadly infections. In otherwise healthy people, salmonellosis may cause short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, vomiting, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea. Long-term complications may include severe arthritis.

Fact Sheet: Salmonella Food Safety Facts

For more information, consumers and industry can call the CFIA at 1-800-442-2342 / TTY 1-800-465-7735 (8:00 a.m. to 8:00p.m. Eastern time, Monday to Friday).

HACCPCanada advocates and mandates HACCP System Certification; with an emphasis on providing Food Safety Confidence to the Consumer. We are a Third-Party Auditor and a Certifying Body (an independent & impartial national organization which evaluates and verifies HACCP systems) and have succeeded in furnishing an economical, effective and expedient Certification Process for the Retail Food Supply Chain including Non-Registered Manufacturing, Warehousing, Logistics, Restaurants and Retail Food Outlets.

Contact us to achieve Certification from HACCPCanada, today!

 

CFIA Releases Statement On Aliya’s Foods Limited

December 1, 2012, Ottawa: Aliya’s Foods Limited, Establishment 720 of Edmonton, Alberta has voluntarily recalled its Trader Joe’s Butter Chicken with Basmati Rice product due to possible Listeria monocytogenes contamination.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has confirmed that all of the affected product was shipped to the United States and was not distributed in the Canadian marketplace. The CFIA informed American officials, who have issued a public health alert in the United States.

The potential contamination was detected on one production line during routine testing. Subsequent testing conducted by the company, and verified by the CFIA, has shown no additional evidence of Listeria contamination.

As a precaution, the CFIA has initiated a food safety investigation. As recommended by the Weatherill Report, no product from the implicated production line will be allowed to enter the Canadian or American marketplace unless the CFIA verifies that tests forListeria monocytogenes are negative.

Harper Government About to Pass the Safe Food for Canadians Act

November 20, 2012, Ottawa: Canadian families will have a stronger food safety system with the anticipated passage of the Safe Food for Canadians Act, S-11, by Parliament, announced Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz.

“Canadian families will be better protected by the passage of the Safe Food for Canadians Act,” said Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz. “The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) will have stronger modernized tools to better protect Canadians and enhance industry compliance.”

Tabled in the Senate last June, the Safe Food for Canadians Act would improve food oversight by:

  • Instituting a more consistent inspection regime across all food commodities;
  • Implementing tougher penalties for activities that put the health and safety of Canadians at risk;
  • Giving inspectors an enhanced ability to compel food producers to provide information in a timely manner and standardized format;
  • Giving the CFIA the authority to require traceability systems for food producers and processors by way of regulation.
  • Providing better control over imports and exports; and
  • Strengthening food traceability throughout the value chain.

Together, these measures will help find products faster in recall situations so they can be removed from the shelves quicker and in a more comprehensive way.

The new legislation, if passed, would also implement tougher fines for activities that put the health and safety of Canadians at risk. Previously, anyone convicted of a serious offence could have been fined up to a maximum of $250,000. Under the proposed legislation, penalties could be as high as $5,000,000, or in the case of the most serious offences, even higher at the court’s discretion. New penalties are also being added for recklessly endangering the lives of Canadians through tampering, deceptive practices or hoaxes.

The proposed legislation is the result of extensive consultation over a number of years with industry, consumer groups, provincial and territorial governments, and other stakeholders. The Act builds on the Harper Government’s commitment to address recommendations from the Weatherill Report and the commitments made in the 2010 Speech from the Throne.

For more information on the Safe Food for Canadians Act, contact the CFIA at 1-800-442-2342.

 

 

Proposed Amendments Benefit Canadian Consumers and Maple Syrup Producers

November 8, 2012, Ottawa: The Government of Canada is proposing to amend the Maple Products Regulations to provide greater consumer confidence in the safety and purity of maple syrup and to enhance export opportunities for Canadian maple producers.

“Nothing is more Canadian than maple syrup,” said Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz. “Canada is the world leader in maple syrup production, with over 80% of the world’s maple syrup exports. These proposed changes will help strengthen our maple producers’ position on the world stage.”

Last spring, the Senate passed a motion which called upon the Government of Canada to modernize and standardize the Maple Products Regulations. Today, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is launching a public consultation on the CFIA website regarding the regulatory changes. Stakeholders, including members of the maple industry and consumers, will have the opportunity to comment on the proposed changes to Canada’s Maple Products Regulations until December 7, 2012.

“I’m pleased to have helped pass a motion in the Senate which will help strengthen Canada’s maple industry,” said Senator Nancy Greene Raine. “Not only will these amendments provide maple producers greater freedom to market their products internationally, they will make it easier for Canadian consumers to purchase the syrup they prefer.”

The proposed changes will standardize maple syrup grade standards, classification systems and labelling requirements. Revised regulations would bring consistency to the maple industry nationally and internationally by providing a uniform definition of what constitutes maple syrup. Additionally, the proposed regulations introduce new requirements for two grades of maple syrup: Grade A, for sale at retail, and Processing Grade, for use in food processing. This would provide consistency to industry and eliminate confusion for consumers.

Amending the Maple Products Regulations would also make it easier for consumers to choose their preferred syrup. In order to be sold at retail, Grade A maple syrup would require a label categorizing the product as one of four different maple syrup colour and taste classes, and identifying the country or province of origin. Furthermore, the proposal to remove restrictions on the size and shape of maple product containers would give consumers more selection when making their purchases.

The proposed changes also include the addition of mandatory lot codes to improve producers’ ability to quickly identify, respond to and advise the CFIA of potentially unsafe maple products. This step is one of many the Government of Canada is taking to enhance the safety of the food supply.

For more information on the proposed changes or to provide your comments, visit theCFIA website at http://www.inspection.gc.ca.

 

National Potato Standard Released

November 7, 2012, Ottawa: A new biosecurity standard was introduced today that will help the potato industry protect its crops.

“Canadian potato producers have an opportunity to strengthen their defences against pests and disease on farm,” said Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz. “A healthy field means a healthy yield for the Canadian potato industry.”

“This excellent tool will allow producers better control of the destiny of their farms,” said Keith Kuhl, Chairman, Canadian Potato Council. “By identifying pathways producers can implement measures which will protect against intrusion of pests.”

The national standard is a tool designed to minimize or prevent and control the introduction and spread of major plant pests and diseases in the potato industry. The National Farm-Level Biosecurity Standard for Potato Growers is a collaboration between the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and the Canadian Potato Council of the Canadian Horticultural Council.

Biosecurity is not a new concept on Canadian farms. The potato standard offers a consistent national approach to controlling major plant pests and diseases in the industry.

The standard is based on three primary themes:

  • farm property management
  • farm operational management
  • plant health management

The standard was developed over two years, in consultation with producers, industry associations, academia, and provincial governments through funding provided by the Growing Forward policy initiative of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. It was designed specifically for the potato industry, and is applicable to farm-level operations of all types and sizes.

To request a copy of the National Farm-Level Biosecurity Standard for Potato Growers or to learn more about plant biosecurity visit the CFIA’s website.

 

Safe Food for Canadians Act Passes Through Standing Committee on Agriculture and Agri-Food

November 6, 2012, Ottawa: The Standing Committee on Agriculture and Agri-Food has completed its review of the Safe Food for Canadians Act and has now referred it back to the House of Commons for Report Stage and Third reading. This brings the Government one step closer to strengthening and modernizing Canada’s food safety system to make sure it continues to provide safe food for consumers.

“This important Act will provide new authorities to address food safety risks and will build additional safety into the system, from processor to importer to consumer,” said Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz.

The Act, which consolidates the authorities of multiple food statutes, specifically allows for:

  • tougher penalties for activities that put the health and safety of Canadians at risk;
  • a more consistent inspection regime across all food commodities;
  • better control over imports and exports; and
  • strengthened food traceability.

“Consolidating authorities into one Act will make inspection and enforcement powers consistent across all food commodities, enabling inspectors to be more efficient, and allowing the CFIA to focus on higher risk areas,” said Minister Ritz. “As a result, Canadian consumers will enjoy a safer food supply.”

For more information on the Safe Food for Canadians Act, contact the CFIA at 1-800-442-2342.

 

CFIA Completes Chemical Residue Study

High compliance rates in more than 20,000 food samples tested over an 18 month period

October 30, 2012, Ottawa: As part of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency‘s (CFIA) annual testing of various food products, a study released today found that more than 98 percent of a wide variety of food samples tested were compliant with Health Canada standards for chemical residues and metals.

This CFIA study was conducted in 2009-2010 under the National Chemical Residue Monitoring Program (NCRMP). Approximately 160,000 tests were performed between April 2009 and September 2010 on more than 20,000 samples, producing over three million results. Samples included domestic and imported dairy, eggs, honey, meat and poultry, fresh and processed fruit and vegetables, and maple products. This and otherCFIA studies are part of an ongoing testing regimen to help keep the food safety system strong for Canadian families.

The annual NCRMP tests foods of animal and plant origins for multiple chemical hazards, including residues of pesticides and veterinary drugs and environmental contaminants. Information obtained through this program allows the CFIA to identify violations and trends, gauge the effectiveness of policies and programs and develop strategic plans to minimize potential health risks to Canadians.

When elevated levels of chemical residues or metals are detected, Health Canada completes an assessment. Based on this assessment, the CFIA determines whether further action is needed. These actions may include notifying the producer or importer, additional inspections, further directed sampling, or product seizure and/or recall. All violations were assessed and appropriate follow-up action was pursued.

The consistently high compliance rates across all commodities tested in the 2009-2010 NCRMP, whether imported or domestic, are similar to previous years’ results. None of the chemical residue levels detected would pose a health concern to Canadians.

Further information on this study is available on the CFIA website.

 

XL Foods Inc. Allowed to Resume Operations Under Enhanced CFIA Oversight

October 23, 2012, Ottawa: Following a thorough assessment of food safety controls at Establishment 38, XL Foods Inc., the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has lifted the suspension on the facility’s licence to operate. Effective today, the plant will be allowed to progressively resume slaughter and processing operations under enhancedCFIA surveillance and increased testing protocols.

Since October 11, CFIA inspectors have been closely monitoring limited, in-house operations, including the cutting and processing of the remaining carcasses in the plant. Following this thorough examination, the Agency determined that the company’sE. coli O157:H7 controls, as well as sanitation and meat hygiene procedures, are being implemented appropriately.

Additional CFIA inspectors—beyond the 46 normally assigned full-time to the plant—will remain at the facility to monitor the company’s slaughter procedures and to ensure strengthened food safety controls are being effectively integrated into daily plant practices.

The CFIA’s enhanced oversight activities include:

  • two additional inspection resources, in addition to the current complement, will focus on certain inspection tasks at key stages of production,
  • increasing testing for E. coli O157:H7, over and above the company’s already established testing protocol, which sees all trim lots sampled and tested, and
  • holding products until all E. coli O157:H7 test results have been assessed.

CFIA inspectors will immediately stop operations at any point if concerns are identified.

Canada’s food safety system remains among the best in the world, but events such as this underscore the need for continuous review and improvement.

The CFIA will be convening its Expert Advisory Committee to conduct a thorough review of events and circumstances related to the XL Foods Inc. E. coli O157:H7 investigation. The Committee is comprised of experts from private sector and academia, and is supported by technical experts from the CFIA, Public Health Agency of Canada, Health Canada and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.

The results of the review will be made public once completed.

As a responsible, science-based regulator, the CFIA regularly reviews its policies and procedures to ensure they are aligned with current science and best practices.

For more information on the investigation: