Pesticides found on Chinese herbs bought in Canada

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Greenpeace samples test positive for residue, Health Canada’s says no pesticides detected

CBC News

Posted: Jul 3, 2013 5:43 AM PT

Greenpeace found toxic levels in traditional Chinese medicine

Greenpeace is raising red flags about herbs used in traditional Chinese medicine after it says it found toxic levels of pesticide residues in herb samples bought in Europe and in North America.

The investigation conducted in seven countries also took samples from stores in Chinatowns in Toronto and Vancouver, and sent them to an independent lab in China for analysis.

Eric Darier, who works on Greenpeace’s agricultural campaign, said some of the herbal remedies were found to be more like pesticide cocktails.

“Internationally, we were shocked by the quantities of pesticide residues we found in all the samples, some of them with alarming numbers. For example, in Canada, the honeysuckle had over 24 pesticide residues,” he said.

Greenpeace tested a number of herbal products sold in Chinatowns in Toronto and Vancouver, including Chinese honeysuckle. It said test results in one honeysuckle sample showed residues from 25 pesticides, and levels that exceeded EU concentration limits for seven of those chemicals.

Greenpeace tested a number of herbal products sold in Chinatowns in Toronto and Vancouver, including Chinese honeysuckle. It said test results in one honeysuckle sample showed residues from 25 pesticides, and levels that exceeded EU concentration limits for seven of those chemicals. (Greenpeace.org)Some of those who sell Chinese medicine say there are safeguards in place at both local and federal levels.

Michael Chung, a doctor of traditional Chinese medicine in Vancouver, said consumers should be concerned about pesticides in their herbs or foods, but good doctors can also be good gatekeepers.

“As a practitioner … we have always been emphasizing the safety of the herbs we give to our patients,” he said. “No matter if it is in powder form or the raw herbs form, we always check with our suppliers to make sure they are safe.”

Albert Fok, a Chinese traditional herbalist in Vancouver, said in his view, government regulations keep the products safe for consumption.

“The government of Canada, Health Canada in particular, they have very stringent rules for importation. The CFIA , the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, is very diligent, very stringent and very zealous on food inspection so those who made it to the retail store are relatively quite safe,” he said.

Health Canada says it has not detected the presence of pesticide in traditional Chinese medicines sold in Canada.

In a statement sent to CBC News, the federal ministry said over the past five years, government labs have analyzed samples of traditional herbs where toxic residue was suspected but so far none has ever been detected.

With files from the CBC’s Petti Fong

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Wonder Berry North America Recalls Umnitza Baby Foods

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Health Hazard Alert – Certain UMNITZA (in Russian language) brand Baby Cereal products may contain mycotoxin

Recall / advisory date:
June 27, 2013
Reason for recall / advisory:
Chemical
Hazard classification:
Class 2
Company / Firm:
Wonder Berry North America
Distribution:
Alberta, Ontario, Quebec
Extent of the distribution:
Retail
Reference number:
8130

Advisory details

Ottawa, June 27, 2013 – The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and Wonder Berry North America are warning the public not to consume certain baby cereal products described below because they may contain mycotoxin HT-2.

There has been one reported illness associated with the consumption of these products.

The affected products have been distributed in Alberta, Ontario, and Quebec.

The importer, Wonder Berry North America, Toronto, Ontario, is voluntarily recalling the affected products from the marketplace. The CFIA is monitoring the effectiveness of the recall.

All lot codes of the following UMNITZA (in Russian language) brand baby cereal products, imported from the Russian Federation, are affected by this alert:

Affected products

Brand Name Common Name Size Codes(s) on Product UPC
UMNITZA Buckwheat Pear & Milk flavour (in Russian language only) 250g All lot codes 4 680002 470580
UMNITZA 7 Grains flavour (in Russian language only) 250g All lot codes 4 680002 470634
UMNITZA 5 Grains flavour (in Russian language only) 250g All lot codes 4 680002 470542
UMNITZA Buckwheat & Pear flavour (in Russian language only) 250g All lot codes 4 680002 470641
UMNITZA Buckwheat & Milk flavour (in Russian language only) 250g All lot codes 4 680002 470535
UMNITZA Corn flavour (in Russian language only) 250g All lot codes 4 680002 470665
UMNITZA Rice flavour (in Russian language only) 250g All lot codes 4 680002 470672
UMNITZA Wheat Cereal, Milk & Pumpkin flavour (in Russian language only) 250g All lot codes 4 680002 474175

More information

HT-2 is a mycotoxin produced by the Fusarium species of moulds. It can grow in food crops such as cereals or grains. HT-2 toxin may cause nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. If you have the affected products in your home, they should not be consumed in order to minimize your child’s exposure. 

Product photos

    • Buckwheat Pear & Milk flavour7 Grains flavour5 Grains flavourBuckwheat & Pear flavour
    • Buckwheat & Milk flavourCorn flavour
    • Rice flavourWheat Cereal, Milk & Pumpkin flavour

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Canadian Tenderized Beef To Get New Safe-Cooking Labels

HACCPCanada Certification - Be InformedAgriculture Minister Gerry Ritz says better labels are part of food safety action plan

CBC News

Posted: May 17, 2013 9:03 AM CST  

Federally registered meat plants will be required to put new safe-cooking labels on mechanically tenderized beefFederally registered meat plants will be required to put new labels on mechanically tenderized beef in order to make it safer for consumers, Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz says.

Speaking in Saskatoon Friday, Ritz said the new rules for tenderized beef, expected to go into effect over the next two months, is part of a wide-ranging food safety action plan.

The government wants consumers to know that mechanically tenderized beef — such as steaks and roasts — needs to be thoroughly cooked to eliminate any risk of E. coli.

In addition to federally registered meat plants, supermarkets are also being encouraged to use warning labels.

There’s a heightened risk because the needles in tenderizing equipment can push E. coli into the interior of the meat. Such meat has to be thoroughly cooked to kill the microbes.

Last fall, at least 16 Canadians became ill from E. coli, sparking a massive recall of beef that came from from an XL Foods meat plant in Brooks, AB.

Mechanical tenderizing was done at the XL plant, raising concerns at the time that stricter rules were required. However, an inquiry into the plant situation did not find that tenderizing was specifically a cause of the E. coli outbreak.

Ritz said the changes will help, but he can’t guarantee large-scale recalls will not happen again.

“Certainly no one wants to see a repeat of the major recalls we’ve seen in this country,” he said.

“Can we guarantee there’ll never be any more? No. Anybody who tells you you can is lying to you.”

Ritz made his announcement in a Saskatoon grocery store, accompanied by officials from Health Canada and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency who deal with meat safety and microbial hazards.

He said CFIA is strengthening some of its beef safety rules, and has put in new mandatory rules to fight E. coli problems in federally registered beef plants.

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Expanded recall: Dry pet food manufactured by Natura Pet Products, Inc.

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Starting date:
May 6, 2013
Posting date:
May 6, 2013
Type of communication:
Consumer Product Recall
Subcategory:
Microbiological – Salmonella
Source of recall:
Health Canada
Issue:
Product Safety
Audience:
General Public
Identification number:
RA-28999

Expansion of April 15, 2013 recall.

Affected products

Dry Pet Food Manufactured by Natura Pet Products, Inc.

Product description

This recall involves the following brands of dry pet food with an expiration date prior to and including March 24, 2014:

  • Innova
  • EVO
  • California Natural
  • HealthWise
  • Karma

Additionally, the recall includes EVO treats and Innova Cat treats with an expiration date prior to and including March 24, 2014.

For a complete list of the specific products affected by this recall, please see the firm’s website.

Hazard identified

A manufacturer in the United States, Natura Pet Products, Inc. has recalled several batches of its dry pet food products due to possible contamination with Salmonella.

Pets such as dogs and cats, and their food can carry Salmonella bacteria. People can get infected with the bacteria from handling their pets or their pet’s food or feces.

Symptoms of salmonellosis often include:

  • sudden onset of fever
  • headache
  • stomach cramps
  • diarrhea
  • vomiting

For more information on the risks of Salmonella infection, please see the Public Health Agency of Canada‘s fact sheet, Salmonella and pets.

Neither Health Canada nor Natura Pet Products, Inc. has received any reports of illnesses related to the recalled pet food products.

Number sold

Approximately 442,960 bags of recalled dry pet food products have been distributed in Canada.

Time period sold

The recall pet food products were sold prior to March 24, 2013.

Place of origin

Fremont, Nebraska, United States of America

Companies

Manufacturer
Natura Pet Products Inc.
2779 Rademakers Way
Fremont
68025
Nebraska
UNITED STATES
Distributor
Le Gastronome Animal Inc.
St-Jean-sur-Richelieu
Quebec
CANADA
Distributor
Maddies Natural Pet Products
Edmonton
Alberta
CANADA
Distributor
Maddies Natural Pet Products
Delta
British Columbia
CANADA
Distributor
Pet Science Ltd
Brampton
Ontario
CANADA
Distributor
Harmony Dog Products
Halifax
Nova Scotia
CANADA

Images (select thumbnail to enlarge)

Innova
EVO
California Natural
HealthWise
Karma

 

What you should do

Consumers should immediately stop using the product and discard it and contact Natura Pet Products, Inc. for further information or a product replacement or refund.

Consumers can call Natura toll-free at 1-800-224-6123, Monday to Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. CST. Additional information on the recalled products can be found at the firm’s website.

Dry pet food manufactured by Natura Pet Products Inc.

2013-04-15 | Consumer products, Food Recall

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Natura Pet Products Inc. Recalls Pet Foods Distributed In Canada

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Dry pet food manufactured by Natura Pet Products Inc.

Starting date:
April 15, 2013
Posting date:
April 15, 2013
Type of communication:
Consumer Product Recall
Subcategory:
Microbiological – Salmonella
Source of recall:
Health Canada
Issue:
Product Safety, Contamination
Audience:
General Public
Identification number:
RA-26765

Affected products

Various dry pet food products manufactured by Natura Pet Products Inc.

Product description

This recall involves the following brands of dry pet food with expiration date 01/07/2013 through 14/03/2014:

  • Innova
  • EVO
  • California Natural
  • HealthWise
  • Karma

For a complete list of the specific products affected by this recall please see the following website.

Hazard identified

A manufacturer in the United States, Natura Pet Products Inc. has recalled several batches of its dry pet food due to possible contamination with Salmonella.

Pets such as dogs and cats, and their food can carry Salmonella bacteria. People can get infected with the bacteria from handling their pets or their pet’s food or feces. Symptoms of salmonellosis often include:

  • sudden onset of fever
  • headache
  • stomach cramps
  • diarrhea
  • vomiting

For more information on the risks of Salmonella infection, please see the Public Health Agency of Canada’s fact sheet here.

Neither Health Canada nor Natura Pet Products Inc. has received any reports of illnesses related to the recalled pet food products.

Number sold

Approximately 46,405 bags of recalled dry pet food products have been distributed in Canada.

Time period sold

December 17, 2012 to March 24, 2013.

Place of origin

Fremont, Nebraska, United States of America

Companies

Manufacturer
Natura Pet Products Inc.
2779 Rademakers Way
Fremont
68025
Nebraska
UNITED STATES
Distributor
Le Gastronome Animal Inc.
St-Jean-sur-Richelieu
Quebec
CANADA
Distributor
Maddies Natural Pet Products
Edmonton
Alberta
CANADA
Distributor
Maddies Natural Pet Products
Delta
British Columbia
CANADA
Distributor
Pet Science Ltd
Brampton
Ontario
CANADA
Distributor
Harmony Dog Products
Halifax
Nova Scotia
CANADA
California Natural
Evo Red Meat Formula
HealthWise
Innova Cat Food

What you should do

Consumers should immediately stop using the product and discard it and contact Natura Pet Products Inc. for further information or a product replacement or refund.

HACCPCanada advocates and mandates HACCP System Certification; with an emphasis on providing Food Safety Confidence to the Consumer. We are a Third-Party Auditor and a Certifying Body (an independent & impartial national organization which evaluates and verifies HACCP systems) and have succeeded in furnishing an economical, effective and expedient Certification Process for the Retail Food Supply Chain including Non-Registered Manufacturing, Warehousing, Logistics, Restaurants and Retail Food Outlets.

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Health Canada Study Finds Parasites In Packaged Salads

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Parasites found in pre-washed packages of lettuce: Health Canada

Andy Johnson, CTVNews.ca Staff
Published Tuesday, Mar. 5, 2013 10:00PM EST

In the first-ever large-scale study of its kind, Canadian researchers have tested how clean pre-washed packages of leafy greens really are, and found parasites in dozens of samples purchased in Ontario.

Looking at 544 samples of store-bought, pre-washed salads, researchers from Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada found nearly one-tenth of the samples were contaminated with either cyclospora, cryptosporidium or giardia — parasites that can cause intestinal illness, such as diarrhea.

“In the present study, a relatively high prevalence of all three parasites was found in packaged, ready-to-eat leafy greens,” said the study, published recently in the Journal of Food Protection.

Parasites found in pre-washed packages of lettuce

Canadian researchers have tested how clean pre-washed packages of leafy greens really are, and found parasites in dozens of samples purchased in Ontario.

Parasites found in pre-washed packages of lettuce

Researchers suspect the water used for irrigation both on American and Canadian farms is contaminated with human excrement.

Parasites found in pre-washed packages of lettuce

 

Brent Dixon with Health Canada says there is concern in the fact that parasites are present in pre-washed lettuce.

 

“This, along with the fact that all isolates tested represented species and genotypes commonly reported in humans, suggests that there is a potential for transmission to consumers, particularly since these leafy greens are typically consumed raw.”

None of the products that tested positive are believed to have been associated with any reported illness outbreaks.

While cryptosporidium has been reported in such food products as apple cider, apples and locally-grown spinach, the study is the first to positively identify cyclospora and giardia in North American produce samples.

Giardia and cryptosporidium are water-borne microscopic parasites that can cause intestinal illnesses such as diarrhea. Cyclospora is a human-borneparasite, spread when food or water is contaminated with human feces.

“The relatively high prevalence of these parasites in packaged salads and leafy greens establishes a baseline for further studies and suggests a need for additional research with respect to the possible sources of contamination of these foods,” the study said.

To conduct the study, the research team purchased a total of 544 prewashed salad samples between April 2009 and March 2010 — all in the Waterloo, Ont. area. After testing the samples, the team found:

  • Nine (1.7%) of the samples tested positive for cyclospora;
  • 32 (5.7%) of the samples tested positive for cryptosporidium;
  • 10 (1.8%) of the samples tested positive for giardia.

*Two of the samples were contaminated with two of the parasites

In total, 507 of the samples were grown in the U.S., with 23 coming from Canada and seven from Mexico. Two were labelled as the products of two countries. Of the contaminated samples, 46 were grown in the U.S. and three were grown in Canada. None of the three Mexican samples tested positive for the parasites.

Brent Dixon, a parasite scientist with Health Canada and one of the report’s authors, said the study breaks new ground for scientists studying the North American food supply chain — and serves as a wake-up call.

“The fact (the parasites) are there at all is of some concern to us,” he told CTV News, adding all the samples tested were labelled as pre-washed and, in some cases, triple-washed.

“Consumers that are concerned can do additional washing, but from what we know it does not remove 100 per cent of pathogens from produce.”

Still, Dixon doesn’t want Canadians turning away from salad; he noted that the health benefits of eating raw greens will likely outweigh the risks of possibly developing diarrhea from eating them.

The study didn’t specify how the samples became contaminated. It is possible that either the food itself or equipment used to process it could have been contaminated during harvest, packaging or transport — or directly from the hands of food handlers who are infected or have poor sanitary practices. Crops can also become contaminated through the use of contaminated water used to mix pesticides or wash produce.

Rick Holley, a microbiology and food safety professor with the University of Manitoba, said the study points to the need for greater scrutiny of Canada’s food-processing systems.

“We really should be at the lower levels, down around less than a one-per-cent (contamination rate),” he said. “These products are eaten raw: we are not cooking these and they have organisms on them that can cause mild to severe health effects in humans.”

Keith Warriner, a food scientist with Guelph University, said the study underlines the fact there are food safety risks associated with leafy greens.

“The issue is that the leafy greens are harvested (and) they are washed, but washing doesn’t do that much … What’s acquired in the field is usually taken straight onto the plate.”

Warriner said consumers wishing to reduce the risk of illness can keep their leafy greens refrigerated, which stops the growth of pathogens.

And for those who are susceptible to a parasitic illness — including the ill, elderly or pregnant — Warriner recommends purchasing intact lettuce as opposed to pre-cut products.

See the original article here.

With a report from CTV medical specialist Avis Favaro and producer Elizabeth St. Philip

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E. Coli Outbreak Reaches 8 Confirmed Cases

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Public Health Notice: E. coli O157:H7 illness related to frozen beef burgers

Updated: 27 February 2013

Why you should take note

Since our last update, an additional case of E. coli O157:H7 illness in Saskatchewan has been confirmed as part of this outbreak investigation. This brings the total number of cases to eight: four in Ontario, two in Alberta, one in Manitoba and one in Saskatchewan. These individuals became ill between late December and mid-February. All cases have recovered or are recovering.

The most recent case is linked to recalled Gourmet Meat Shoppe Big and Juicy frozen beef burgers.

The risk to Canadians remains low because all products found to be contaminated were recalled from store shelves. It remains important that Canadians not eat any of the recalled beef products. Check your freezer and if you have recalled products in your home, return them to the store or throw them out.

Products contaminated with E. coli O157:H7 can pose a serious public health risk. We want to remind Canadians to take precautions to avoid food-borne illness, for example:

  • Cook meat to a safe internal temperature—use a food thermometer to be sure;
    • Thick burgers like the ones recalled need to be cooked longer than regular sized ones to be sure they’re safe.
  • Wash your hands before and after cooking;
  • Keep knives, counters and cutting boards clean;
  • Keep raw meats separate from other foods when you store them; and
  • Refrigerate or freeze left-overs promptly.

The Public Health Agency of Canada continues to lead the coordination of the investigation into this outbreak in close collaboration with its health and food safety partners.

Additional cases of illness may be identified and linked to this outbreak in the future.

Status

Investigations into outbreaks of food-borne illness can be complex. Since early December 2012, the Agency has been leading a committee that includes public health and food safety experts from the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Health Canada and Provincial and Territorial Health Authorities. The committee meets regularly to share and review the latest information and determine what actions should be taken to protect Canadians.

Based on all the information collected to date – epidemiological, microbiological and food safety – the following cases of illness are linked to the specific strain of E. coli O157 found in the recalled frozen beef burgers. More information about the epidemiological investigation is also available.

Province / Territory Total cases
  Alberta 2
  Ontario 4
  Manitoba 1
  Saskatchewan 1
  Total 8

Over the course of the investigation, an additional reported case of E. coli O157:H7 illness was found to have the same strain of E. coli as one found in a recalled product. However, the case could not be definitively linked to the outbreak associated with this investigation because there was not enough food history information available to connect the individual with the contaminated product. This individual died in early December as a result of the illness.

More information about products that have been recalledand how that aspect of the investigation has unfolded, is available on the CFIA website.

E. coli O157 food-borne illnesses are not uncommon in Canada and no unusual increases in the number of these illnesses have been detected nationally.

 

 

E. coli In Frozen Burger Patties Now At 7 Confirmed Cases

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Public Health Notice: E. coli O157:H7 illness related to frozen beef burgers

Public Health Agency of Canada

Updated: 22 February 2013

Why you should take note

Through ongoing monitoring and surveillance activities, two additional cases of E. coli O157:H7 illness have been confirmed as part of this outbreak investigation; one in Manitoba and one in Ontario. This brings the total number of cases to seven: four in Ontario, two in Alberta and one in Manitoba. These individuals became ill between late December and late January. All cases have recovered or are recovering.

The two most recent cases are linked to recalled Gourmet Meat Shoppe Big and Juicy frozen beef burgers.

The risk to Canadians remains low because all products found to be contaminated were recalled from store shelves. It remains important that Canadians not eat any of the recalled beef products. Check your freezer and if you have recalled products in your home, return them to the store or throw them out.

Products contaminated with E. coli O157:H7 can pose a serious public health risk. We want to remind Canadians to take precautions to avoid food-borne illness, for example:

  • Cook meat to a safe internal temperature—use a food thermometer to be sure;
    • Thick burgers like the ones recalled need to be cooked longer than regular sized ones to be sure they’re safe.
  • Wash your hands before and after cooking;
  • Keep knives, counters and cutting boards clean;
  • Keep raw meats separate from other foods when you store them; and
  • Refrigerate or freeze left-overs promptly.

The Public Health Agency of Canada continues to lead the coordination of the investigation into this outbreak in close collaboration with its health and food safety partners.

Additional cases of illness may be identified and linked to this outbreak in the future.

Status

Investigations into outbreaks of food-borne illness can be complex. Since early December 2012, the Agency has been leading a committee that includes public health and food safety experts from the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Health Canada and Provincial and Territorial Health Authorities. The committee meets regularly to share and review the latest information and determine what actions should be taken to protect Canadians.

Based on all the information collected to date – epidemiological, microbiological and food safety – the following cases of illness are linked to the specific strain of E. coli O157 found in the recalled frozen beef burgers. More information about the epidemiological investigation is also available.

Province / Territory Total cases
  Alberta 2
  Ontario 4
  Manitoba 1
  Total 7

Over the course of the investigation, an additional reported case of E. coli O157:H7 illness was found to have the same strain of E. coli as one found in a recalled product. However, the case could not be definitively linked to the outbreak associated with this investigation because there was not enough food history information available to connect the individual with the contaminated product. This individual died in early December as a result of the illness.

More information about products that have been recalled and how that aspect of the investigation has unfolded, is available on the CFIA website.

E. coli O157 food-borne illnesses are not uncommon in Canada and no unusual increases in the number of these illnesses have been detected nationally.

What you should do

Most strains of E. coli are harmless; however, some strains, such as E. coli O157:H7, can make people sick, causing severe stomach cramps, diarrhea and vomiting. Serious complications of an E. coli O157:H7 infection can include kidney failure.

If you think you are sick with an E. coli O157:H7 infection, consult a healthcare professional.

Symptoms of an E. coli O157:H7 infection

Like other food-borne illnesses, the symptoms of E. coli infection mainly involve the gut. Symptoms may vary from person to person; however, they often include:

  • severe stomach cramps;
  • diarrhea (often watery and may develop into bloody);
  • vomiting; and
  • fever (generally not very high – usually less than 38.5˚C/101˚F).

Symptoms usually last five to seven days.

Overall, around 5 to 10 per cent of those who get sick from E. coli O157:H7 develop hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), an acute renal failure which can be fatal. Of those, children younger than 5 years old and the elderly are at greatest risk of developing HUS. Symptoms of HUS vary. Some people have seizures or strokes and some need blood transfusions and kidney dialysis. Others live with side effects such as permanent kidney damage.

Who is most at risk?

Infections can occur among people of all ages, however symptoms are likely to be more severe among the very young and the elderly.  Pregnant women and people with weakened immune systems are also at high risk of developing serious complications.

How to protect yourself

Proper hygiene and safe food handling and preparation practices are key to preventing the spread of all food-borne illnesses, including E. coli.

Hand washing is one of the best ways to prevent the spread of foodborne illness.

Contaminated foods may look and smell normal. It is important to ensure that you thoroughly cook foods to destroy bacteria. Recalled products, however, should not be consumed and should be thrown away.

 

Sequel Naturals Ltd Recalls Vega One French Vanilla

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Information Update – Bacteria found in “Vega One French Vanilla”: Product lots being recalled

OTTAWA, Feb. 21, 2013 /CNW/ – Sequel Naturals Ltd. is voluntarily recalling three lots of its natural health product “Vega One French Vanilla” in various sizes (see table below) after testing conducted by Health Canada identified bacteria that could pose a risk to consumers with weakened immune systems.

The testing found the presence of Klebsiella species (K. oxytoca), Citrobacter braakii, Cronobacter sakazakii group, Enterobacter cloacae complex, Acinetobacter species (A. baumannii and A. haemolyticus) and Leclercia adecarboxylata.

While none of these bacteria present a significant risk to healthy Canadians, K. oxytoca poses a potential risk to the health of Canadians with immune systems weakened by serious illnesses. This bacterium can cause infection of the lower intestine, causing cramps and watery, bloody diarrhea. It may also cause lung infections and urinary tract infections. If introduced into a wound, it may cause infections of the skin, soft tissues, organs, or blood poisoning.

Sequel Naturals Ltd. is requesting that retailers immediately stop sale of these products and return them to the company. The product is sold in various locations across Canada, including pharmacies, natural health stores and grocery stores. The product is also available at www.myvega.com.

Health Canada is monitoring the recall by Sequel Naturals Ltd. Should new information be identified, the Department will provide an update to Canadians.

Canadians who have concerns about their use of this product should consult with their health care practitioner. Consumers wishing more information on this recall can contact Sequel Naturals Ltd. at 1-866-839-8863.

The following information will help consumers identify affected product and can be found on the product label and outer packaging.

Product Quantity Lot Expiry Date
Vega One French Vanilla 414 g 42245900 July 2014
Vega One French Vanilla 827 g 42245800 July 2014
Vega One French Vanilla 37.6 g 2308000 July 2014

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SOURCE Health Canada

 

Salmonella outbreak hits 30 in southwestern Alberta

The Canadian Press

Posted: Dec 24, 2012 5:34 PM ET

Last Updated: Dec 24, 2012 10:27 PM ET

Health officials in southwestern Alberta are dealing with an acute outbreak of salmonella.

Officials in Lethbridge say there are more than 30 cases, mostly in rural areas.

Many of the infections are secondary ones, meaning it is being spread by household contact.

Symptoms include nausea and vomiting and residents are warned that the most serious complication is dehydration.

Dirty cooking surfaces along with undercooked eggs and poultry are the common causes of salmonella.

Alberta health officials are working with Health Canada and First Nations and Inuit Health to stem the outbreak.