United States FSMA Imported Foods Rule Takes Effect

HACCPCanada Certification - Be Informed

 

Source
By Linda Larsen (May 30, 2013)

One of the new rules mandated by the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) is being put into effect today. the “Information Required in Prior Notice of Imported Food” is now a final rule and is the law of the land. This rule is designed to stop contaminated food at U.S. borders. If a food that is waiting for clearance into the country has been refused entry by another country, it will be rejected at the border.

Food importers must follow this rule, which was originally put into place in 2002 after 9/11. The rule states, “for purposes of this regulation, FDA considers ‘refused entry’ to mean a refusal of entry or admission of human or animal food based on food safety reasons, such as intentional or unintentional contamination of an article of food. This is consistent with the intent of the provision, which is to provide FDA with additional information to better identify imported food shipments that may pose a safety or security risk to U.S. consumers.”

Anyone who has submitted prior notice of imported food, including food for animals, must report any country to which the article has been refused entry. This rule is part of the Public Health Security and BIoterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002, which was signed into law on June 12, 2002.

This rule has been in place as an interim rule since May 2011. There were no changes to the final rule. There were only fifteen comments published in the Federal Register; none objected to the rule. Most were asking for more information and definition about terms and phrases in the rule.

HACCPCanada advocates and mandates HACCP System Certification; with an emphasis on providing Food Safety Confidence to the Consumer. We are a Certifying Body (an independent & impartial national organization which evaluates and verifies HACCP systems) and have succeeded in furnishing an economical, effective and expedient Certification Process for the Retail Food Supply Chain including Non-Registered Manufacturing, Warehousing, Logistics, Restaurants and Retail Food Outlets.

Contact us to achieve Certification from HACCPCanada, today!

 

CFIA Suspends License for Establishment 449, AKME Poultry, Butter & Eggs Distributors Inc.

HACCPCanada Certification - Be Informed

 

May 07, 2013, Ottawa: The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has suspended the licence to produce poultry products for Establishment 449, AKME Poultry, Butter & Eggs Distributors Inc., effective May 6, 2013. The company is located in Saint-Eustache, Quebec.

The CFIA has determined that adequate controls for food safety are not being reliably implemented in the facility on a consistent basis. The company has failed to correct deficiencies previously identified through CFIA inspections including corrective action requests related to general hygiene requirements.

AKME Poultry, Butter & Eggs Distributors Inc., will not be able to resume operations until they have fully implemented the necessary corrective actions and the CFIA is fully confident in the plant’s capacity to effectively manage food safety risks.

The safety of consumers is the CFIA‘s top priority and the Agency will work diligently to ensure there is no potential risk to consumers. Additional information will be provided as soon as it becomes available.

HACCPCanada advocates and mandates HACCP System Certification; with an emphasis on providing Food Safety Confidence to the Consumer. We are a Third-Party Auditor and a Certifying Body (an independent & impartial national organization which evaluates and verifies HACCP systems) and have succeeded in furnishing an economical, effective and expedient Certification Process for the Retail Food Supply Chain including Non-Registered Manufacturing, Warehousing, Logistics, Restaurants and Retail Food Outlets.

Contact us to achieve Certification from HACCPCanada, today!

 

China Arrests 900 In Fake Meat Scandal

HACCPCanada Certification - Be Informed

 

Chinese authorities seize 20,000 tonnes of illegal meat products and detains gang passing off fox, mink and rat as mutton

A Chinese vendor sells pork in a Hong Kong market

China’s other food safety scares include reports of glow-in-the-dark pork, exploding watermelons and fake eggs. Photograph: Vincent Yu/AP

Police in China have arrested 904 people for “meat-related offences” over the past three months, including a gang that made more than £1m by passing off fox, mink and rat meat as mutton, the country’s public security ministry has announced.

Since January, authorities have seized 20,000 tonnes of illegal products and solved 382 cases of meat-related crime – primarily the sale of toxic, diseased and counterfeit meat.

One suspect, named Wei, earned more than £1m over the past four years by purchasing fox, mink and rat meat, treating it with gelatin, carmine (a colour produced from ground beetles) and nitrate, then selling it as mutton at farmers’ markets in Jiangsu province and Shanghai. Authorities raided Wei’s organisation in February, arresting 63 suspects and seizing 10 tonnes of meat and additives.

Suspects in the Baotou city produced fake beef and lamb jerky from duck meat and sold it to markets in 15 provinces. Levels of E coli in the counterfeit product “seriously exceeded standards”, the ministry said.

A baby who suffers from kidney stones after drinking tainted milk powder, Chengdu, China. September 22, 2008A baby treated for kidney stones after drinking tainted milk powder, in Chengdu, China. Photograph: China Photos/Getty 

 

 

Hao, another suspect, from Fengxiang city, Shaanxi province, last year sold mutton that had turned black and reeked of agricultural chemicals to a barbecue restaurant, killing one customer and poisoning a handful of others.

In Fujian province, five suspects were arrested and two factories shut for butchering disease-ridden pig carcasses and selling their meat in nearby provinces. The suspects had been hired by the agriculture ministry to collect the carcasses from farmers and dispose of them properly.

Authorities closed two factories in the south-western province of Guizhou for soaking chicken feet in hydrogen peroxide before shipping them to markets. And in Zhenjiang city, Jiangsu province, two people were arrested for selling pork products that were made with meat from “poor quality pig heads”.

China’s meat markets are already reeling from a spring riddled with foodsafety scares. Pork sales plummeted in March after about 16,000 pig carcasses were dredged from a river in Shanghai, an incident authorities have yet to fully explain. A virulent strain of avian flu has killed 26 people and put more than 129 in hospital since mid-April, wreaking havoc on the domestic poultry industry.

New guidelines calling for harsher penalties for those found guilty of producing or selling unsafe food products were announced by the country’s top court on Friday.

The supreme people’s court said the guidelines would list as crimes acts such as the sale of food excessively treated with chemicals or made from animals that have died from disease or unknown causes.

rats

A gang made more than £1m by passing off mink and rat meat as mutton. Photograph: PA

China’s food safety authorities are turning their attention to dairy products, according to the Xinhua state news agency. In 2008, more than 54,000 infants became ill and six were killed after being fed milk and baby formula that was tainted with the industrial chemical melamine.

Other food safety scandals in recent years include reports of glow-in-the-dark pork, exploding watermelons, cadmium-laced rice, fake eggs, salmonella-tainted seafood, carcinogenic recycled cooking oil and pesticide-soaked fruit.

HACCPCanada advocates and mandates HACCP System Certification; with an emphasis on providing Food Safety Confidence to the Consumer. We are a Third-Party Auditor and a Certifying Body (an independent & impartial national organization which evaluates and verifies HACCP systems) and have succeeded in furnishing an economical, effective and expedient Certification Process for the Retail Food Supply Chain including Non-Registered Manufacturing, Warehousing, Logistics, Restaurants and Retail Food Outlets.

Contact us to achieve Certification from HACCPCanada, today!

 

XL Foods workers question food safety at meat plant

 

Union says workers tell them management lacked concern for safe practices

CBC News

Posted: Oct 5, 2012 7:34 AM MT

The union representing XL Foods workers, as well as several former and current employees, say food safety was regularly jeopardized inside the Brooks, Alta.-based plant at the centre of an E. coli scare.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency shut down the Alberta plant last week, and its licence to operate the plant was temporarily suspended in the midst of a nationwide meat recall.

Tom Hesse with the United Food and Commercial Workers said the union has heard from employees about problems that could lead to tainted meat.

“Some [workers] are saying to us, ‘No, I wouldn’t eat the product that’s produced in my own workplace’,” said Hesse. “They tell us that management has a general lack of concern for food safety practices.”

The union held a special meeting with about a dozen XL Foods workers this week.

There were reports that workers didn’t sterilize their knives between cuts and if they did, they couldn’t keep up with the workflow, said Hesse.

Management, he said, turned a blind eye.

One man who worked for an industrial company that had a contract with XL Foods told CBC News that he saw an employee go into the washroom wearing his protective gear during one of his trips to the plant.

“Throwing it on the washroom floor in front of all the urinals and relieving himself and then picking up his garments off the floor. Picking up his scabbord with his knives off the floor and then returning to the production facility,” said the man, whose identity the CBC agreed to conceal.

XL Foods Inc. said in a press release Thursday it was taking “full responsibility” and is working to “implement changes to our food safety system to exceed existing high standards and regain the trust of Canadian consumers,” including enhanced testing.

Cleaning equipment reportedly clogged

CBC News has also spoken with several current and former XL Foods employees who said they also saw safety concerns prior to the meat recall.

Former employee Kyle Sailikin, who now operates a butcher shop in rural Saskatchewan, said cleaning equipment would frequently get clogged at the plant, but the company had other concerns.

“Processing came first, all times,” he said. “That was No. 1, was processing. It wasn’t cleaning, it wasn’t safety, it wasn’t the people working there. It was processing.”

Other employees described unhygienic behaviour, including workers on the line not washing hands and wearing contaminated clothing into areas which should have been kept clean.

Hesse said he was told at the union meeting that there are also claims that bosses are reluctant to stop the line when problems are found.

“[Workers] told us that shortly before the CFIA shut the plant down there was a sewage back up on both the slaughter and process floor,” said Hesse. “That’s obviously a serious issue in terms of food safety.

“They’re saying that XL is more concerned with the numbers they can produce rather than the safety of the workers or the safety of the product.”

Since the recall began, XL Foods has not agreed to any interviews.

The company’s Thursday press release also outlined changes to its food safety system that include more surveillance, more staff and better training.

Meanwhile, dozens of people have joined a class-action lawsuit against XL Foods, according to a lawyer acting for a man who became sick from E. coli after eating a steak that came via the company’s Brooks plant.

 

The Contaminated Basil Recall Grows Larger…

 

Possible presence of the bacteria Salmonella in some dried basil

Product Photos

Related Alerts: 2012-08-15 | 2012-08-10 | 2012-08-09 | 2012-08-08 | 2012-08-07 | 2012-08-06 | 2012-08-03

OTTAWA, August 15, 2012 – The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is warning the public, retailers and food service establishments not to consume, sell or use dried basil products described below because these products may be contaminated with Salmonella.

A survey of food safety is in progress. The CFIA is working with various parties to identify and remove all the products off the market dried basil, 3 August 2012, by Shah Trading Co. Ltd.. located in Scarborough (Ontario) .

Mark Product Format UPC o batch
No Weight basil variable No Sold to stores Cananut
1565 Chabanel O. Montreal, (Quebec)
6858 Jean-Talon E, St-Leonard, (Quebec),
4913 St-Jean, Pierrefonds (Quebec)
2995 Dagenais O. Laval, (Quebec),
May 31, 2012 to August 15, 2012

These products were distributed in Quebec.

No illnesses associated with consumption of these products have been reported.

Food contaminated with Salmonella may not look alteration or smell spoiled.Consumption of food contaminated with this bacteria may cause salmonellosis, a foodborne illness. In young children, the elderly and people with weakened immune systems, salmonellosis may cause serious infections, sometimes fatal. In healthy people, salmonellosis may include symptoms of short duration such as high fever, severe headache, vomiting, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea. Salmonellosis may cause long-term complications include severe arthritis.

The distributor is voluntarily recalling the affected products. The CFIA is monitoring the effectiveness of the recall.

Basil
Basil

 

Canadian Food Inspection Agency tests pre-packaged ground spices for gluten

 

August 15, 2012, Ottawa: As part of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency’s (CFIA) routine testing of various food products, a study released today found that more than 99% of pre-packaged ground spice samples tested for gluten would not pose a risk to gluten-sensitive consumers.

A total of 268 imported and domestic pre-packaged ground spices were collected from retail stores in 2010-2011. Health Canada determined that the very low but detectable levels of gluten in 62 of those samples, and the small amount of spice typically consumed in a meal, would not pose a health risk to sensitive consumers. One sample of mace was recalled due to a high level of gluten. This demonstrates the strength of the Canadian food safety system in identifying these foods and removing them immediately from the marketplace.

Pre-packaged ground spices sold in Canada are not permitted to contain any other ingredients. However, occasionally spices may contain undeclared gluten, either intentionally added during packaging or from cross contamination during food production. This is contrary to the Food and Drugs Act and may pose a health risk to sensitive individuals.

When there is a detection of elevated levels Health Canada completes an assessment to determine if the specific level poses a health risk, based on the contaminant’s level, expected frequency of exposure and contribution to overall diet. These factors help determine whether further action is needed, up to and including product seizure and/or recall. If a human health risk is found, a public recall notice is issued immediately.

The results have been shared with the food and consumer products industry to support their ongoing food safety activities.

Further information on this survey report is available on the CFIA website.

 

 

The Dried Basil Recall Continues…the List Grows Longer

 

Certain dried BASIL may contain Salmonella bacteria

Product photos

Related alerts: 2012-08-10 | 2012-08-09 | 2012-08-08 | 2012-08-07 | 2012-08-06 | 2012-08-03

OTTAWA, August 10, 2012 – The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is warning the public, distributors and food service establishments not to consume, sell, serve or use the dried Basil products described below because they may be contaminated withSalmonella.

This is an ongoing food safety investigation.  The CFIA is working with various parties to identify and remove all affected basil products that were made with the dried basil recalled by Shah Trading Co. Ltd., Scarborough, Ontario on August 3, 2012.

Brand Product Size UPC Lot #
All Seasons Basil Rubbed 2.27 kg(5 lb) 0 66844 22133 9 21861R, 21371R, 20791R, 20741R, 20631R, 20531R *
All Seasons Basil Rubbed 2.27 kg(5 lb) 0 66844 20058 7 * 20891R *
All Seasons Basil Rubbed 2.27 kg(5 lb) None * 210111, 211411, 211511, 212211, 213611, 216011, 220811 or no code *
McArthur Food
Market
Basil Rubbed Various
weights
None Sold from
McArthur Food Market,
300 McArthur Avenue
Ottawa, ON from
February 7, 2012 to
August 9, 2012 inclusive
None – sold
from bulk bin at Tutti Fruiti Famous Foods
64 Kensington Ave, Toronto, ON
Basil Various
weights
None Sold from March 20,
2012 to August 10, 2012
inclusive
Marche Victoria Rubbed Basil 50 g 200000 400996 Sold from
Marché Victoria
6324 Victoria
Montreal, QC and
Marché Victoria
4759 Blvd. des Sources, Pierrefonds,QC from
May 4 2012 to
August 10, 2012
inclusive
None Basil 100 g None Sold from
Toronto Cash & Carry,
1405 Gerald Street, Toronto, ON from
March 2, 2012 to
August 10, 2012
inclusive
Sold from bulk bin
at Bulk Food Warehouse
1621 Wilson Ave, North York, ON
Basil Various
weights
None Sold from April 10, 2012 to August 10, 2012 inclusive
None Basil 50 g None Sold from
House of  Spice
190 Augusta Avenue, Toronto, ON from  February 8, 2012
to August 10, 2012 inclusive
None Basil 100 g None Sold from
House of  Spice
190 Augusta Avenue, Toronto, ON from  February 8, 2012
to August 10, 2012 inclusive
None Basil 200 g None Sold from
House of  Spice
190 Augusta Avenue, Toronto, ON from February 8, 2012
to August 10, 2012 inclusive
Sold from bulk bin
at Sugar & Spice
265 Augusta Ave,
Toronto, ON
Basil Various
weights
None Sold from May 15, 2012 to August 10, 2012
inclusive
Iqbal Foods IHF Basil
Rubbed
50 g 472253100309 Sold from Iqbal Foods
2 Thorncliffe Park Drive
Toronto, ON from
March 8 2012 to August
9, 2012 inclusive

* Corrections to previous release

These products have been distributed in Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Alberta and New Brunswick. However, they may have been distributed in other provinces.

There have been no reported illnesses associated with the consumption of these products.

Food contaminated with Salmonella may not look or smell spoiled. Consumption of food contaminated with this bacteria may cause salmonellosis, a foodborne illness. In young children, the elderly and people with weakened immune systems, salmonellosis may cause serious and sometimes deadly infections. In otherwise healthy people, salmonellosis may cause short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, vomiting, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea. Long-term complications may include severe arthritis.

The importer, Shah Trading Co. Ltd., Scarborough, ON and other distributors are voluntarily recalling the affected products from the marketplace. The CFIA is monitoring the effectiveness of the recall.

 


Product Photos

All Seasons - Basil Rubbed - 2.27 kilogram (5 pound)
All Seasons – Basil Rubbed – 2.27 kg (5 lb)

All Seasons - Basil Rubbed - 2.27 kilogram (5 pound)
All Seasons – Basil Rubbed – 2.27 kg (5 lb)

All Seasons - Basil Rubbed - 2.27 kilogram (5 pound)
All Seasons – Basil Rubbed – 2.27 kg (5 lb)

All Seasons - Basil Rubbed - 2.27 kilogram (5 pound)
All Seasons – Basil Rubbed – 2.27 kg (5 lb)

McArthur Food Market - Basil Rubbed
McArthur Food Market – Basil Rubbed

McArthur Food Market - Basil Rubbed
McArthur Food Market – Basil Rubbed

House of Spice - 50 gram
House of Spice – 50 g

House of Spice - 100 gram
House of Spice – 100 g

House of Spice - 200 gram
House of Spice – 200 g

Iqbal Foods - 50 gram
Iqbal Foods – 50 g

 

Harper Government Improving Inspection Approach to Strengthen Food Safety

 

August 9, 2012, Ottawa: The Government of Canada released today its draft model for improving food inspection in Canada. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is proposing a single approach to food inspection that will provide consistent and appropriate oversight across all regulated food commodities – either imported or produced domestically.

“We have a world-class food safety system in Canada but we want it to be the best,” said Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz. “A single inspection approach will make an even stronger system that will benefit all Canadians.”

The draft food inspection model is based on feedback from discussions with inspectors and industry stakeholders as well as feedback on a recent discussion document calledThe Case for Change that outlined the rationale for modernizing inspection.

This initiative is part of the commitment made by the Government of Canada in Budget 2011, which provided the CFIA with $100 million over five years to modernize food safety inspection in Canada. In addition to building a consistent inspection model, this investment is being used to provide better training and more modern tools to front line food inspectors as well as building additional capacity in CFIA laboratories.

The CFIA is seeking comments from consumers and industry stakeholders until October 31, 2012 on the following aspects of the proposed draft model:

  • a single licensing and registration requirement for those manufacturing, importing and/or exporting food for trade outside provincial borders,
  • more consistent oversight and inspection across all regulated food commodities,
  • a scaled approach that adapts to the size and complexity of businesses, and
  • the distribution of more information to consumers about compliance and enforcement activities.

The CFIA is planning extensive outreach activities on this proposed model with its inspectors, consumer associations, industry, and federal, provincial and territorial government counterparts in the fall. The model will continue to be developed based on feedback that the Agency receives.

The CFIA is carrying out a number of complementary initiatives including a review of theCFIA’s regulatory frameworks and the Safe Food for Canadians Act, tabled in June, which aims to modernize and strengthen food legislation. Together, these initiatives are part of a comprehensive effort to better manage food safety challenges and make food as safe as possible for Canadian families.

 

More Contaminated Dried Basil Recalled

Certain dried BASIL may contain Salmonella bacteria

Product photos

Related alerts: 2012-08-08 | 2012-08-07 | 2012-08-06 | 2012-08-03

OTTAWA, August 8, 2012 – The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is warning the public, distributors and food service establishments not to consume, sell, serve or use the dried Basil products described below because they may be contaminated withSalmonella.

This is an ongoing food safety investigation.  The CFIA is working with various parties to identify and remove all affected basil products that were made with the dried basil recalled by Shah Trading Co. Ltd., Scarborough, Ontario on August 3, 2012.

Brand Product Size UPC Lot #
Valli Basil flakes 15 g 7 78768 14324 5 Sold since February 23, 2012
Sold from bulk drawer at Herb & Spice
375 Bank Street, Ottawa, ON
Basil Various weights None Sold from March 6, 2012 to August 7, 2012 inclusive
New Middleast Supermarket Basil (Habak) Various weights Begins with 0 200170 Sold at New Middleast Supermarket,
1755 Bank Street, Ottawa,ON
from March 29, 2012 to August 8, 2012 inclusive
Mid-East Foods Sweet Basil Various weights Begins with 200302 50 Sold at Mid-East Foods,
1010 Belfast Road, Ottawa, ON
since May 1st, 2012

These products have been distributed in Quebec and Ontario. However, they may have been distributed in other provinces.

There have been no reported illnesses associated with the consumption of these products.

Food contaminated with Salmonella may not look or smell spoiled. Consumption of food contaminated with this bacteria may cause salmonellosis, a foodborne illness. In young children, the elderly and people with weakened immune systems, salmonellosis may cause serious and sometimes deadly infections. In otherwise healthy people, salmonellosis may cause short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, vomiting, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea. Long-term complications may include severe arthritis.

The distributors are voluntarily recalling the affected products from the marketplace. The CFIA is monitoring the effectiveness of the recall.

For more information consumers and industry can call the CFIA at 1-800-442-2342 / TTY1-800-465-7735 (8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday to Friday).

 

Product Photos

Click on image for larger view

Valli - Basil flakes
Valli – Basil flakes

New Middleast Supermarket - Basil (Habak)
New Middleast Supermarket – Basil (Habak)

Mid-East Foods - Sweet Basil
Mid-East Foods – Sweet Basil

CFIA HEALTH HAZARD ALERT: Spice Kingdom Dried Egyptian Basil

 

SPICE KINGDOM brand dried EGYPTIAN BASIL may contain Salmonella bacteria

OTTAWA, August 3, 2012 – The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and Shah Trading Co. Ltd. are warning the public, distributors and food service establishments not to consume, sell, serve or use the Spice Kingdom brand dried Egyptian Basil described below because the product may be contaminated with Salmonella.

The affected product, Spice Kingdom brand BASIL – EGYPTIAN, 30M, Whole, Fancy, bearing Lot No. 4685/E, was sold in bulk 25 kg (55 lbs) bags to cash & carry outlets, restaurants, bakeries and food service establishments in Quebec, Ontario and Manitoba.

There have been no reported illnesses associated with the consumption of this product.

Food contaminated with Salmonella may not look or smell spoiled. Consumption of food contaminated with this bacteria may cause salmonellosis, a foodborne illness. In young children, the elderly and people with weakened immune systems, salmonellosis may cause serious and sometimes deadly infections. In otherwise healthy people, salmonellosis may cause short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, vomiting, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea. Long-term complications may include severe arthritis.

The importer, Shah Trading Co. Ltd., Scarborough, ON is voluntarily recalling the affected product from the marketplace. The CFIA is monitoring the effectiveness of the recall.

For more information consumers and industry can call the CFIA at 1-800-442-2342 / TTY1-800-465-7735 (8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday to Friday).

 

Spice Kingdom brand Egyptian Basil
Spice Kingdom brand Egyptian Basil