Organic Pomegranate Kernels Recalled

HACCPCanada Certification - Be Informed

 

In light of the recent recalls of Organic Berry Blends that have linked imported Pomegranate Kernels from Turkey to an outbreak of Hepatitis A, HACCPCanada felt it necessary to inform the Canadian Public of the this recall in the United States.  UNFI imported potentially infected product from Townsend Farms into Canada and, although no notice has been released, UNFI may have also imported this product.  Be diligent and check the production dates if you possess the following product.

Scenic Fruit Company Recalls Woodstock Frozen Organic Pomegranate Kernels Due To Possible Health Risk

June 26, 2013 – Scenic Fruit Company of Gresham, Oregon today announced it is voluntarily recalling 5,091 cases (61,092 eight ounce bags) of Woodstock Frozen Organic Pomegranate Kernels. Based on an ongoing epidemiological and traceback investigation by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) of an illness outbreak, the kernels have the potential to be contaminated with Hepatitis A virus.

No illnesses are currently associated with Woodstock Frozen Organic Pomegranate Kernels and product testing to date shows no presence of Hepatitis A virus in Woodstock Frozen Organic Pomegranate Kernels. The company’s decision to voluntarily recall products is made from an abundance of caution in response to an ongoing outbreak investigation by the FDA and CDC. The organic pomegranates are imported from Turkey.

Products were shipped from February 2013 through May 2013 to UNFI distribution centers in California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Iowa, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Texas, and Washington State. UNFI distribution centers may have further distributed products to retail stores in other states.

Woodstock Organic Pomegranate Kernels are sold in eight-ounce (227 gram) resealable plastic pouches (see image) with UPC Code 0 42563 01628 9. Specific coding information to identify the product can be found on the back portion of these pouches below the zip-lock seal. The following lots are subject to this recall:

  • C 0129 (A,B, or C) 035 with a best by date of 02/04/2015
  • C 0388 (A,B, or C) 087 with a best by date of 03/28/2015
  • C 0490 (A,B, or C) 109 with a best by date of 04/19/2015

Hepatitis A is a contagious liver disease that results from exposure to the hepatitis A virus, including from food. It can range from a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a serious illness lasting several months. Illness generally occurs within 15 to 50 days of exposure and includes fatigue, abdominal pain, jaundice, abnormal liver tests, dark urine and pale stool.

Hepatitis A vaccination can prevent illness if given within two weeks of exposure to a contaminated food. In rare cases, particularly consumers who have a pre- existing severe illness or are immune compromised, Hepatitis A infection can progress to liver failure.

Persons who may have consumed affected product should consult with their health care professional or local health department to determine if a vaccination is appropriate, and consumers with symptoms of Hepatitis A should contact their health care professionals or the local health department immediately.

For more information about the outbreak, please visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Web site at http://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/Outbreaks/2013/A1b-03-31/index.html or call 800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636), TTY: (888) 232-6348.

Consumers with the product should not consume the product. The product should be disposed of immediately. Please keep proof of product purchase.

For questions or more information, contact the Scenic Fruit Company at 877-927-3434 or email to info@scenicfruit.com from Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. PDT

HACCPCanada advocates and mandates HACCP System Certification; with an emphasis on providing Food Safety Confidence to the Consumer. We are a Certifying Body (an independent & impartial national organization which evaluates and verifies HACCP systems) and have succeeded in furnishing an economical, effective and expedient Certification Process for the Retail Food Supply Chain including Non-Registered Manufacturing, Warehousing, Logistics, Restaurants and Retail Food Outlets.

Contact us to achieve Certification from HACCPCanada, today!

Advertisements

United States FSMA Imported Foods Rule Takes Effect

HACCPCanada Certification - Be Informed

 

Source
By Linda Larsen (May 30, 2013)

One of the new rules mandated by the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) is being put into effect today. the “Information Required in Prior Notice of Imported Food” is now a final rule and is the law of the land. This rule is designed to stop contaminated food at U.S. borders. If a food that is waiting for clearance into the country has been refused entry by another country, it will be rejected at the border.

Food importers must follow this rule, which was originally put into place in 2002 after 9/11. The rule states, “for purposes of this regulation, FDA considers ‘refused entry’ to mean a refusal of entry or admission of human or animal food based on food safety reasons, such as intentional or unintentional contamination of an article of food. This is consistent with the intent of the provision, which is to provide FDA with additional information to better identify imported food shipments that may pose a safety or security risk to U.S. consumers.”

Anyone who has submitted prior notice of imported food, including food for animals, must report any country to which the article has been refused entry. This rule is part of the Public Health Security and BIoterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002, which was signed into law on June 12, 2002.

This rule has been in place as an interim rule since May 2011. There were no changes to the final rule. There were only fifteen comments published in the Federal Register; none objected to the rule. Most were asking for more information and definition about terms and phrases in the rule.

HACCPCanada advocates and mandates HACCP System Certification; with an emphasis on providing Food Safety Confidence to the Consumer. We are a Certifying Body (an independent & impartial national organization which evaluates and verifies HACCP systems) and have succeeded in furnishing an economical, effective and expedient Certification Process for the Retail Food Supply Chain including Non-Registered Manufacturing, Warehousing, Logistics, Restaurants and Retail Food Outlets.

Contact us to achieve Certification from HACCPCanada, today!

 

Canadian Family to Sue Tanimura & Antle for Romaine Lettuce E. coli Death

HACCPCanada Certification - Be Informed

 

POSTED BY BILL MARLER ON APRIL 29, 2013
In August 2012, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) isolated E. coli O157:H7 in a sample of Tanimura & Antle romaine lettuce collected on August 8, 2012.  This finding prompted CFIA to issue a “Health Hazard Alert” notice on August 17, 2012 warning the public to not consume Tanimura & Antle brand romaine lettuce, UPC 0 27918 20314 9.[1]  The alert was expanded to include additional distribution information on August 20, 2012.  The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (USDA) posted a notice that on August 19 Tanimura & Antle was recalling “Wrapped Single Head Romaine.”[2]  Genetic testing by Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) identified the strain of E. coli O157 found in the Tanimura & Antle sample as “ECXA1.1775/ECBN1.0012.”  See PFGE, Attachment No. 1. This was a rare strain, not seen in Canada since 2009.  The CFIA announcement noted that there had been “no reported illnesses associated with consumption of this product.”  Unfortunately, this assessment would prove to be tragically incorrect.  Two Canadians—a person in Ontario and a person in Alberta were identified as being infected with strain ECXA1.1775/ECBN1.0012.  Gail Bernacki was the Alberta resident identified as being a genetic match to the E. coli O157 strain found in Tanimura & Antle romaine lettuce.

On August 23, 2012, Mrs. Bernacki experienced onset of vomiting and diarrhea.  Her stool specimen collected at Rockyview General Hospital on August 26 was culture positive for E. coliO157:H7.  She eventually died on January 16th, 2013, leaving her husband, three children and a large, loving family.

Genetic testing by Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) showed that Gail Bernacki was infected with E. coli O157:H7 strain ECXA1.1775/ECBN1.0012.  See Bernacki Completed NDR Interview Form, Alberta Health Services, Attachment No. 2.  CFIA analyzed a “partial head of Tanimura and Antle Romaine Lettuce UPC 0 27918 20314 9” from the Bernacki home on September 2012.  E. coli O157:H7 was not isolated in the uneaten portion of the lettuce but it is clear that the contaminated product was in the Bernacki home and that a portion had been consumed.  See CFIA Report of Analysis, Food Products Sampling Submission, Attachment No. 3.

Noted foodborne illness epidemiologist, Dr. John Kobayashi, reviewed the facts of the outbreak and Mrs. Bernacki’s E. coli O157:H7 infection.  Dr. Kobayashi opined on a more probable than not basis that Gail Bernacki was ill with an E. coli O157:H7 infection and that the source of her infection was Tanimura and Antle Romaine, which was contaminated with E. coli O157:H7. See Expert Report of John Kobayashi, MD, Attachment No. 4.

Suit will be filed in Federal Court in California.  Download complaint.


[2]           See http://www.fda.gov/safety/recalls/ucm316256.htm.

 

HACCPCanada advocates and mandates HACCP System Certification; with an emphasis on providing Food Safety Confidence to the Consumer. We are a Third-Party Auditor and a Certifying Body (an independent & impartial national organization which evaluates and verifies HACCP systems) and have succeeded in furnishing an economical, effective and expedient Certification Process for the Retail Food Supply Chain including Non-Registered Manufacturing, Warehousing, Logistics, Restaurants and Retail Food Outlets.

Contact us to achieve Certification from HACCPCanada, today!

 

CONSUMERS CONSUME …NOT ASSUME!

The day has arrived, when no one, anywhere should Assume…

[uh-soom] Show PA verb, as·sumed, as·sum·ing. verb (used with object)to take for granted or without proof!

When it comes to food safety, “assuming” can kill you! Consumers in the past have been raised with the mindset that it is safe to assume that everyone, everywhere is doing everything they can to make our food safe, mostly because they were! However, consumers are learning that this is an old truth. The world has changed in such a way that it has affected the faith and confidence in the means by which our food is imported from around the world to how it is served on our dinner plates.

We are discovering that less than 2% of Canadian food is inspected at our borders. Which would be perfectly fine, if everywhere around the world had excellent, high standards for food safety, but they do not! Food arrives, is distributed into warehouses, travels to our grocery stores or restaurants and is on our plates before day’s end.

The global and domestic production, distribution, and preparation of our food is a massive undertaking. The food chain has multiple critical steps, passing through countless government agencies, organizations, companies, and peoples. An informed consumer grasps the folly to trust and assume, without documented, verified proof that each and every step is handled with the utmost care and consideration for safe consumption.

Our assumption days are done. Consumers across our land are beginning to comprehend, realize and expect confirmation, substantiation, verification, and evidence that our food producers, distributors and handlers are really doing what they say they’re doing in protecting and providing uncontaminated food.

Retail food outlets, from grocery stores to street vendors, must take heed, not to make the fruitless assumption that their customers will continue to blindly trust them and take their word that the food is safe to eat. Meanwhile, daily reports of food-borne illness outbreaks and food recalls have begun the undermining of the general populace’s confidence and assurance.

We have the Power, Intellect and Technology to achieve the transition from “assuming” to “assuring”. The power and voice of the consumer is still viable in this world today…united together to demand proof through every means possible, including the universal benchmark of certification, will go a long way in establishing a new era for the food safe culture. Intellect is our weapon against presumption, to plan and work toward averting potential disasters by empowering third party, arm’s length governing bodies to oversee the safe principles and practices for food safety. And technology is allowing for quicker and more convenient ways to communicate, and monitor the ongoing day to day details of the process of safe food production.

As another new day begins, and the confidence builds, consumers everywhere can sit down, this evening to a plateful of food and enjoy their contribution to the overall food safety conscience by simply not assuming it is safe. 

From the desk of Skye Marie, CEO of HACCPCanada

HACCPCanada Certification - Be Informed

Kaytee Products Recalls Forti-Diet Pro Health Mouse, Rat and Hamster

 

HACCPCanada Certification - Be Informed

HACCPCanada advocates and mandates HACCP System Certification; with an emphasis on providing Food Safety Confidence to the Consumer. We are a Third-Party Auditor and a Certifying Body (an independent & impartial national organization which evaluates and verifies HACCP systems) and have succeeded in furnishing an economical, effective and expedient Certification Process for the Retail Food Supply Chain including Non-Registered Manufacturing, Warehousing, Logistics, Restaurants and Retail Food Outlets.

Contact us to achieve Certification from HACCPCanada, today!

Forti-Diet Pro Health Mouse, Rat and Hamster Recall

Kaytee Pet Products is recalling a single manufacturing batch of Kaytee Forti-Diet Pro Health Mouse, Rat and Hamster due to possible contamination with Salmonella. The product affected by this recall is identified below and has the following “Best Before” dates:

Material # UPC Code Size Product Name/Description Best Before Code
(day-month-year)
100502315 71859 00001 6/5 lb. Kaytee Forti-Diet Pro Health Mouse, Rat & Hamster 03-Apr-2013 K61
100502086 71859 99995 25 lb. Kaytee Forti-Diet Pro Health Mouse, Rat & Hamster 31-Mar-2013
100502085 71859 99994 6/3 lb. Kaytee Forti-Diet Pro Health Mouse, Rat & Hamster 31-Mar-2013 K63
100502275 71859 00000 25 lb. Kaytee Forti-Diet Pro Health Mouse, Rat & Hamster – Petco Stores Only 30-Mar-2013


Product and product lots that do not appear on the list above are not subject to this recall.

Having a hard time finding the best before code please click here.

No human or pet illnesses have been reported to-date. The recall notification is being issued based on a single manufacturing batch wherein a sample with the “Best Before” date of (lot) 03APR13K61 had a positive result for Salmonella in a random sample test conducted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The Kaytee Forti-Diet Pro Health Mouse, Rat & Hamster product was originally manufactured on January 5 and 6, 2012. Kaytee is taking immediate action to remove the product from all retail stores and distribution centers, and to fully investigate the cause.

Salmonella can affect animals eating the products and there is a risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products.

Healthy people exposed to Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. Rarely, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms. Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.

Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting. Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.

Recalled products were distributed to retailers and distributors in the states of Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin; and, into the countries of Abu Dhabi, Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Brunei, Canada, China, Costa Rica, Czechoslovakia, Dominican Republic, Dutch Antilles, Finland, Germany, Great Britain, Greece, Guam, Honduras, Hong Kong, Ireland, Israel, Japan, Korea, Kuwait, Mexico, New Zealand, Pakistan, Panama, Russia, Singapore, South Africa, Sweden, Thailand, and Trinidad.

Consumers who have purchased the Kaytee Forti-Diet Pro Health Mouse, Rat & Hamster product with the above-referenced “Best Before” dates are urged to contact Kaytee Customer Service representatives.

Kaytee Customer Service representatives and company veterinarians are responding to inquires through the 1-800-Kaytee1 (800 529-8331) phone number or the form below and will answer any questions regarding pets that have been fed the product.

Contact:
Customer Service:
1-800-KAYTEE1 (1-800-529-8331)
Email: KayteeForti-DietProHealthMouseRatHamsterRecall@central.com

Third-Party Audits – Their Crucial Role in Moving Forward With FSMA and Food Safety

BY DR. DAVID W. K. ACHESON | NOVEMBER 27, 2012OPINION

I recently had the honor of speaking at the 2012 Safe Quality Food International Conference in Cincinnati on the topic of the crucial role of third-party audits in moving forward with FSMA and food safety. In the talk, I spent time looking at what is working well with third-party audit systems, and where some of the vulnerabilities are. Based on reflections from giving that talk, I thought I would share some of what I see as the key points in this week’s newsletter.

At this point in time, the use of third-party audits has potential to be a massive success or a dismal failure depending on the outcome of the continued momentum to build a robust system.  Currently there are at least three forces in play in the third-party audit world, each of which is interrelated. Specifically, these three areas are:

  1. The private sector drivers with expanding use of third-party audit systems under the umbrella of the Global Food Safety Initiative (GFSI);
  2. The impact of the requirements in FSMA around using third-party audits in relation to imported foods;
  3. The impact of the recent report from the Government Accountability Office (GAO) on this issue.

As we consider some of the pressure points in the third-party audit system, one of the vulnerabilities that I think is important is the recognition that the audit is always a “snap shot in time” exercise. This then raises the question – whether you are the recipient of a third-party audit or the person who doing that audit: Why is the audit being undertaken? Is it to protect your brand, so you really want the auditor to find the gaps in your system? Or is it to safeguard against the likelihood of litigation or share that risk with someone else if something goes wrong? Or, is it simply to generate the required certificate to allow you to sell your products? It may even be some combination of the above, but in my view the way to both receive and execute an audit is the first one – you really want to find out where the holes are in your system and fix them. Then when you get your certificate, don’t relax! Keep up the pressure, fix the problems, look for continuous improvement and make that “snap shot” assessment into a “movie” of continuous improvement.

As we consider third-party audits, there are two words that signify success to me: that is, having a system that is trustworthy and rigorous. That is what will make it a success for the regulators and the private sector.

As we look at the role that U.S.food regulators have played in the evolution of the third-party audit system, it was the melamine episode in 2007 that focused attention on this issue for FDA. Melamine and melamine by-product contamination of wheat gluten drove FDA to recognize that the systems around import safety needed a radical rethink. This 2007 event drove the opening of several FDA offices overseas (China, Latin America, India, Europe, etc.), as well as the 2008 Shrimp Pilot and many of the specific sections in FSMA.

The Shrimp Pilot was FDA’s first foray into the third-party audit space with the intent of figuring out if the Agency could use third-party audits and what some of the challenges around such a program would be. The pilot answered those questions, and, while the answers were not all that some would have liked, they were encouraging enough for FDA to proceed and include the use of third-party audits as an important part of import controls in FSMA.

The final version of FSMA included at least two key sections that will specifically leverage third-party audits: Section 303, giving FDA the authority to require certificates (issued by third-party auditors) for high risk foods, and Section 302, the Voluntary Qualified Importer Program (VQIP). So if FDA is going to use information from third-party audits to address these two sections, who will be considered an appropriate third-party auditing body?

The language in FSMA provides quite a list of potential third-party auditors including:

  • Foreign governments
  • An agency of a foreign government
  • Any other third-party, as the Secretary determines appropriate
  • A single individual
  • Audit agents employed or used by third-party auditors to help conduct consultative and regulatory audits.

When it comes to foreign governments, FDA must audit the food safety programs, systems, and standards of the government or agency to determine the capability of ensuring that “they meet the requirements of this Act with respect to food manufactured, processed, packed, or held for import into the United States.” When it comes to private entities, FDA must use an accreditation body, which can be FDA itself if the Agency so chooses. However, I think it is both more likely and more sensible if the FDA uses an outside party as the accreditor. Either way the accreditation body needs to perform reviews and audits of the training and qualifications of audit agents and review the internal systems of the auditing body to determine that each entity “has systems and standards in use to ensure that such entity or food meets the requirements of this Act.

Thus FDA is setting a high bar, as it should, because there are certainly organizations waiting in the wings to point out that when the “fox guards the henhouse” the system does not adequately protect the U.S. consumer. Again, this goes back to the systems being both rigorous and trustworthy.

Increasing Rigor and Trust of GFSI Systems

The importance of rigor and trust is not unique to FSMA-related, third-party audit activities. These attributes are also critical for the success of GFSI and the various schemes under the GFSI umbrella. As we look at the GFSI systems, there are some things that are working well and some things that are not working so well.

One attribute of GFSI continues to be its concept of “once audited, accepted everywhere.” While for some, this has meant a reduction in outside audits, it is certainly not the case in all situations. Other attributes are its establishment of a process for robust standards that can adapt to any changes that new FSMA regulations may require, the program’s movement from being retail centric into the manufacturing and ingredient supplier space, and its expansion into a global system.

When considering aspects of GFSI that have room for improvement, I see a clear need for more well-trained auditors. I urge GFSI, and all the schemes under GFSI, to embark on the development of third-party-audit training programs through established educational institutions, such as universities. There are many bright, capable individuals who could establish a career in this space. Such a career could be based on a robust education and training program coupled with mentored, hands-on training, and ongoing oversight of audit execution to reinforce both rigor and trust.  Recognizing that the life of an auditor is a life on the road, such a career path can evolve from third-party auditor to in-house food-company QA manager and back to third-party auditor. We need to establish a career track in this space that is desirable, fun, and lucrative. Finally, there is a need for proactive public relations activity.  Third-party audit systems continue to take media hits with little robust defensive response – this can and should be addressed. The purpose of an audit, and the inherent limitations associated with audits need to be communicated.

I mentioned in the opening portion the impact of a new GAO study. This study assessed the capability of FDA to meet the FSMA mandate for third-party audit programs and essentially concluded that the Agency could not meet the mandate. GAO appeared to urge FDA to consider using the USDA/FSIS model of equivalency rather than the more robust system proposed in FSMA. If FDA were to go down that road it would undermine the use of private third-party audit systems in relation to FDA-regulatory activity. Personally I don’t think equivalency is workable for FDA due to the breadth and variability of FDA-regulated foods.  FDA is not required to follow GAO’s recommendations, but these recommendations sow a seed of doubt into the system, and part of that doubt creates a vulnerability around private third-party audits. If FDA chooses to make it easier for foreign governments to issue the required certificates for high-risk foods and VQIP, then that will undermine the role that private third-party audits would play

As we move into the next four years of the Obama administration, all those involved in third-party audit systems need to recognize that we are at a fork in the road. We have the option of rapid global expansion and broader recognition of such systems by regulators, or the option of a private sector-centric system that is on a slow trajectory to optimization. The choice is ours. I advocate for the former. Let’s drive this hard, and prove that the system can be both rigorous and trustworthy. This will require energy and leadership as well as resources, but the potential losses from not going down that fork far outweigh the costs of the alternate pathway of mediocrity that the regulators cannot trust.

As a final word – if you are being audited, use that information to improve your systems, and don’t relax when the auditors leave but build from their input. If you are an auditor, it is essential to recognize the importance of your role and its increasing responsibility, but also to leverage the potential opportunities that are coming.

This article originally appeared on Leavitt Partners’ Food Safety blog November 14, 2012.

© Food Safety News

 

CFIA Recalls Imported Purefit Bars

Certain PUREFIT brand PEANUT BUTTER CRUNCH BARS may contain salmonella bacteria

OTTAWA, October 16, 2012– The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is warning the public not to consume PureFit brand Peanut Butter Crunch bars listed below because they may be contaminated with salmonella.

The following products are affected by this alert:

Brand Product Size UPC Best By dates /
Lot Codes
PureFit Peanut Butter Crunch bars 56.7 g
8 12787 00100 8 1 March 2012;
12 July 2013
PureFit Peanut Butter Crunch Box of 15 8 12787 00200 5 1 March 2012;
12 July 2013

These products may have been distributed nationally.

There have been no reported illnesses associated with the consumption of these products.

Food contaminated with salmonella may not look or smell spoiled. Consumption of food contaminated with these bacteria may cause salmonellosis, a foodborne illness. In young children, the elderly and people with weakened immune systems, salmonellosis may cause serious and sometimes deadly infections. In otherwise healthy people, salmonellosis may cause short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, vomiting, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhoea. Long-term complications may include severe arthritis.

These products have been recalled by the legal agent’s in the United States. For more information on these recalls please see the U.S. Food and Drug Administration websiteat:  http://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/default.htm.

For more information, consumers and industry can call the CFIA at 1-800-442-2342 /TTY 1-800-465-7735 (8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday to Friday).

 

Purefit brand Peanut Butter Crunch Bar
Purefit brand Peanut Butter Crunch Bar

 

 

Certain PEANUT BUTTERS, PEANUT SPREADS and RELATED PRODUCTS may contain Salmonella bacteria

OTTAWA, October 10, 2012- The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is warning the public not to consume the peanut butter containing products listed below because they may be contaminated with Salmonella.

The following products are affected by this alert:

Brand Product Size UPC Best By dates / Lot Codes
Harry &
David®
Crunchy Almond
and Peanut Butter
12 oz 780994738737 Best By:
01MARCH11
through
24SEPT13
Harry &
David®
Creamy Banana
Peanut Spread
12 oz 780994738713 Best By:
01MARCH11
through
24SEPT13
Harry &
David®
Creamy Caramel
Peanut Spread
12 oz 780994757868 Best By:
01MARCH11
through
24SEPT13
Harry &
David®
Creamy Raspberry
Peanut Spread
12 oz 780994738720 Best By:
01MARCH11
through
24SEPT13
Harry &
David®
Apple Snack Box Box contains
12 oz peanut
spread listed
above
unknown Lot code:
0092M
through 2372M
or 0092H
through 2372H
Wolferman’s® Bee Sweet
Gift Basket
Basket contains
12 oz peanut
spread listed
above
unknown Lot code:
0092M
through 2372M
or 0092H
through 2372H
Wolferman’s® Hearty Snack
Gift Basket
Basket contains
12 oz peanut
spread listed
above
unknown Lot code:
0092M
through 2372M
or 0092H
through 2372H
Wolferman’s® All-Day
Assortment
Gift Basket
Basket contains
12 oz peanut
spread listed
above
unknown Lot code:
0092M
through 2372M
or 0092H
through 2372H
Wolferman’s® Father’s Day
Basket
Basket contains
12 oz peanut
spread listed
above
unknown Lot code:
0092M
through 2372M
or 0092H
through 2372H
Fairytale Peanut Butter
Brownies
3” x 3” in
clear wrap
606961100072 Lot Codes:
11H121
18H122
20H122
06I12
09I12
10I12
11I12
13I12
16I12
Fairytale Peanut Butter
Sprites
3” x 1.5” in
brown wrap
606961200079 Lot Codes:
09H121
16H121
22H121
24H122
28H12
04I12
19I12
Fairytale Peanut Butter
Cookies
3.25” round
in clear wrap
606961800071 Lot Codes:
07H121
10H121
13H121
20H122
28H12
02I12
14I12
Justin’s Classic Peanut
Butter Jars
16 oz 855188003004 Best By:
08-07-13
Justin’s Honey Peanut
Butter Squeeze
Packs
1.15 oz 855188003042 Best By:
07-24-13,
07-25-13
Justin’s Honey Peanut
Butter 0.5 oz
Squeeze Packs
0.5 oz 894455000391 Best By:
07-14-13,
08-10-13,
08-13-13,
08-14-13,
08-15-13

These products may have been distributed nationally through Internet sales from the United States.

There have been no reported illnesses associated with the consumption of these products.

Food contaminated with Salmonella may not look or smell spoiled. Consumption of food contaminated with these bacteria may cause salmonellosis, a foodborne illness. In young children, the elderly and people with weakened immune systems, salmonellosis may cause serious and sometimes deadly infections. In otherwise healthy people, salmonellosis may cause short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, vomiting, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea. Long-term complications may include severe arthritis.

These products have been recalled by the legal agent’s in the United States. For more information on these recalls please see the U.S. Food and Drug Administration website at: http://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/default.htm.

For more information, consumers and industry can call the CFIA at 1-800-442-2342 /TTY 1-800-465-7735 (8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday to Friday).

Justin's - Justin's - Honey Peanut Butter Blend

Justin’s – Honey Peanut Butter
Blend
Justin's - Honey Peanut Butter Blend - 80 calorie
Justin’s – Honey Peanut Butter
Blend – 80 calorie
Justin's - Classic Peanut Butter All Natural
Justin’s – Classic Peanut Butter
All Natural
Justin's - Classic Peanut Butter Jars - 16 ounce
Justin’s – Classic Peanut Butter
Jars – 16 oz
Fairytale - Peanut Butter Cookies
Fairytale – Peanut Butter
Cookies
Fairytale - Peanut Butter Sprites
Fairytale – Peanut Butter Sprites
Fairytale - Peanut Butter Brownies
Fairytale – Peanut Butter Brownies

Additional information

RASFF Initiates Recall of Fattorie Chiarappa Ricotta Cheese Imported from Italy

Notification detail – 2012.1395

Print this pageExport to XML

Listeria monocytogenes (presence /25g) in ricotta cheese from Italy

Reference :  2012.1395
Notification date :  03/10/2012
Last update :  03/10/2012
Notification type :  food  –  alert  –  official control in non-member country
Action taken :  withdrawal from the market
Notification from :  ITALY (IT)
Distribution status :  distribution to other member countries
Product :  ricotta cheese
Product category :  milk and milk products
Follow-up :

Reference Follow-up from Date Follow-up type Info
Hazards :

Substance / Hazard Category Analytical result Units Sampling date
Listeria monocytogenes pathogenic micro-organisms presence /25g
Distributed to :

| AUSTRALIA | BELGIUM | CANADA | EGYPT | FRANCE | GERMANY | GREECE | JAPAN | MEXICO | NETHERLANDS | ROMANIA | UNITED STATES  |
Origin :

| ITALY  |

Trader Joe’s Nut Butters Now Recalled in Canada

 

Certain TRADER JOE’S brand NUT BUTTERS may containSalmonella bacteria

Product photos

OTTAWA, September 25, 2012 – The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and Transilvania Trading are warning the public not to consume Trader Joe’s brand nut butters described below because the products may be contaminated with Salmonella.

The following Trader Joe’s brand products are affected by this alert:

Product Size UPC Codes
Almond Butter with Roasted Flaxseeds, Crunchy & Salted 16 oz
(454 g)
0094 0795 All Best-If-Used-By dates between May 1, 2013 and September 24, 2013 (Stamped on the side of the jar’s label below the lid of the jar.)
Valencia Peanut Butter with Roasted Flaxseeds, Crunchy & Salted 16 oz
(454 g)
0098 9275 All Best-If-Used-By dates between May 1, 2013 and September 24, 2013 (Stamped on the side of the jar’s label below the lid of the jar.)

These products have been sold at Transilvania Trading (Pirate Joe’s), located at 3474 West Broadway, Vancouver, BC.

There have been no reported illnesses associated with the consumption these products.

Food contaminated with Salmonella may not look or smell spoiled. Consumption of food contaminated with these bacteria may cause salmonellosis, a foodborne illness. In young children, the elderly and people with weakened immune systems, salmonellosis may cause serious and sometimes deadly infections. In otherwise healthy people, salmonellosis may cause short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, vomiting, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea. Long-term complications may include severe arthritis.

The importer, Transilvania Trading, Vancouver, BC is voluntarily recalling the affected products from the marketplace. The CFIA is monitoring the effectiveness of the recall.

For more information, consumers and industry can call the CFIA at 1-800-442-2342 /TTY 1-800-465-7735 (8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday to Friday).

Almond Butter with Roasted Flaxseeds, Crunchy & Salted

Almond Butter with Roasted Flaxseeds, Crunchy & Salted

Valencia Peanut Butter with Roasted Flaxseeds, Crunchy & Salted
Valencia Peanut Butter with Roasted Flaxseeds, Crunchy & Salted