Nestle Canada Recalls Delissio Frozen Pizza

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Health Hazard Alert – Delissio brand Thin Crispy Crust Grilled Chicken, Tomato & Spinach pizza may contain pieces of plastic

Recall / advisory date:
May 2, 2013
Reason for recall / advisory:
Extraneous Material
Hazard classification:
Class 2
Company / Firm:
Nestle Canada Inc.
Distribution:
National
Extent of the distribution:
Retail
Reference number:
8002
 

Advisory details

Ottawa, May 2, 2013 – The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and Nestlé Canada Inc. are warning the public not to consume the Delissio brand Thin Crispy Crust Grilled Chicken, Tomato & Spinach pizza described below as it may contain pieces of plastic.

There have been no reported consumer complaints about this product in Canada.

The importer, Nestlé Canada Inc., North York, ON is voluntarily recalling the affected product from the marketplace. The CFIA is monitoring the effectiveness of the recall.

Affected products

Brand Name Common Name Size Codes(s) on Product UPC
Delissio Thin Crispy Crust Grilled Chicken, Tomato & Spinach Pizza 665g 3068 5273 C1 BB / MA 2013 OC05
3095 5273 C1 BB / MA 2013 NO01
0 71921 03341 5

More information

For more information, consumers and industry can contact:

Nestlé Canada Inc. at 1-888-809-9265 (9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Eastern time Monday to Friday);

    • Delissio brand Grilled Chicken, Tomato & Spinch pizza

HACCPCanada advocates and mandates HACCP System Certification; with an emphasis on providing Food Safety Confidence to the Consumer. We are a Third-Party Auditor and a Certifying Body (an independent & impartial national organization which evaluates and verifies HACCP systems) and have succeeded in furnishing an economical, effective and expedient Certification Process for the Retail Food Supply Chain including Non-Registered Manufacturing, Warehousing, Logistics, Restaurants and Retail Food Outlets.

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Trophy Nut Recall Grows

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Expanded Health Hazard Alert – Certain Trophy brand Nut Mix In Shell may contain Salmonella bacteria

Recall / advisory date:
April 10, 2013
Reason for recall / advisory:
Microbiological – Salmonella
Hazard classification:
Class 2
Company / Firm:
Trophy Foods Inc.
Distribution:
Alberta, British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, National
Extent of the distribution:
Retail

Advisory details

Ottawa, April 10, 2013 – The public warning issued on April 4, 2013 has been updated to include an additional product because this product may be contaminated with Salmonella. Previously identified products included in this recall can be found on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) website.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and Trophy Foods Inc. are warning the public not to consume Trophy brand Nut Mix In Shell because they may be contaminated with Salmonella.

This product has been distributed in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and may have been distributed to other provinces.

There have been no reported illnesses associated with the consumption of this product.

The manufacturer, Trophy Foods Inc., Calgary, Alberta is voluntarily recalling the affected product from the marketplace. The CFIAis monitoring the effectiveness of the recall.

Affected products

Brand Name Common Name Size UPC Additional Info
Trophy Nut Mix In Shell sold in 907 g packages 0 59966 04851 9 Best Before date 2014 NO 02

More information

Food contaminated with Salmonella may not look or smell spoiled. Consumption of food contaminated with these bacteria may cause salmonellosis, a foodborne illness. In young children, the elderly and people with weakened immune systems, salmonellosis may cause serious and sometimes deadly infections. In otherwise healthy people, salmonellosis may cause short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, vomiting, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea. Long-term complications may include severe arthritis.

For more information on foodborne pathogens, visit the Causes of Food Poisoning web page.

For more information, consumers and industry can contact the CFIA by filling out the online feedback form.

    • Trophy brand Nut Mix In Shell

HACCPCanada advocates and mandates HACCP System Certification; with an emphasis on providing Food Safety Confidence to the Consumer. We are a Third-Party Auditor and a Certifying Body (an independent & impartial national organization which evaluates and verifies HACCP systems) and have succeeded in furnishing an economical, effective and expedient Certification Process for the Retail Food Supply Chain including Non-Registered Manufacturing, Warehousing, Logistics, Restaurants and Retail Food Outlets.

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Osmat Imports Stuffed Eggplants Recalled

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Health Hazard Alert – Osmat Imports brand Stuffed Eggplants may contain dangerous bacteria

Recall / advisory date:
April 10, 2013
Reason for recall / advisory:
Microbiological – Clostridium botulinum
Hazard classification:
Class 1
Company / Firm:
Osmat Imports
Distribution:
Alberta, British Columbia
Extent of the distribution:
Retail

Advisory details

Ottawa, April 10, 2013 – The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and Osmat Imports are warning the public not to consume the Osmat Imports brand Stuffed Eggplants product described below because it may be contaminated with Clostridium botulinum. Toxins produced by these bacteria may cause botulism, a life-threatening illness.

The affected product, Osmat Imports brand Stuffed Eggplants, was sold in 2 kg jars (4.4 lbs) bearing UPC 8 37770 00009 7 and Best Before: Lot 6 EXP JA 14.

There have been no reported illnesses associated with the consumption of this product.

The importer, Osmat Imports, North Vancouver, BC is voluntarily recalling the affected product from the marketplace. The CFIA is monitoring the effectiveness of the recall.

Affected products

Brand Name Common Name Size UPC Additional Info
Osmat Imports Stuffed Eggplants sold in 2 kg jars (4.4 lbs) 8 37770 00009 7 Best Before: Lot 6 EXP JA 14.

More information

Food contaminated with Clostridium botulinum toxin may not look or smell spoiled. Consumption of food contaminated with the toxin may cause nausea, vomiting, fatigue, dizziness, headache, double vision, dry throat, respiratory failure and paralysis. In severe cases of illness, people may die.

For more information on foodborne pathogens, visit the Causes of Food Poisoning web page.

    • Osmat Imports brand Stuffed Eggplants

 

HACCPCanada advocates and mandates HACCP System Certification; with an emphasis on providing Food Safety Confidence to the Consumer. We are a Third-Party Auditor and a Certifying Body (an independent & impartial national organization which evaluates and verifies HACCP systems) and have succeeded in furnishing an economical, effective and expedient Certification Process for the Retail Food Supply Chain including Non-Registered Manufacturing, Warehousing, Logistics, Restaurants and Retail Food Outlets.

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St. Thomas Bottled Lobster Recalled for Botulism

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Updated Health Hazard Alert – Certain St. Thomas brand Bottled Lobster may contain dangerous bacteria

Recall / advisory date:
April 6, 2013
Reason for recall / advisory:
Microbiological – Clostridium botulinum
Hazard classification:
Class 1
Company / Firm:
St-Thomas Fish Market Inc.
Distribution:
New Brunswick, National
Extent of the distribution:
Retail

Advisory details

Ottawa, April 6, 2013 – The public warning issued on March 23, 2013 has been updated to include an additional product because this product may be contaminated with Clostridium botulinum. Previously identified products included in this recall can be found on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) website.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is warning the public not to consume the bottled Lobster described below because it may be contaminated with Clostridium botulinum. Toxins produced by these bacteria may cause botulism, a life-threatening illness.

This product has been distributed in New Brunswick and may have been distributed in other provinces.

The CFIA is monitoring the effectiveness of the recall.

Affected products

Brand Name Common Name Size Codes(s) on Product UPC
St.Thomas Lobster 285 g
(drained weight)
On cover of jar:
13921, 14021, 19121, 19521, 20221, 20521, and 20822
0 81971 90072 8

More information

For more information, consumers and industry can contact the CFIA by filling out the online feedback form.

Food contaminated with Clostridium botulinum toxin may not look or smell spoiled. Consumption of food contaminated with the toxin may cause nausea, vomiting, fatigue, dizziness, headache, double vision, dry throat, respiratory failure and paralysis. In severe cases of illness, people may die.

For more information on foodborne pathogens, visit the Causes of Food Poisoning web page.

    • St. Thomas brand Bottled Lobster

 

HACCPCanada advocates and mandates HACCP System Certification; with an emphasis on providing Food Safety Confidence to the Consumer. We are a Third-Party Auditor and a Certifying Body (an independent & impartial national organization which evaluates and verifies HACCP systems) and have succeeded in furnishing an economical, effective and expedient Certification Process for the Retail Food Supply Chain including Non-Registered Manufacturing, Warehousing, Logistics, Restaurants and Retail Food Outlets.

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Central-Epicure Gefilte Fish Recalled for Botulism

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Health Hazard Alert – Certain Central-Epicure brand Gefilte Fish, Ready to Serve may contain Dangerous Bacteria

Recall / advisory date:
March 30, 2013
Reason for recall / advisory:
Microbiological – Clostridium botulinum
Hazard classification:
Class 1
Company / Firm:
Central-Epicure Food Products Ltd.
Distribution:
Ontario, Quebec

Advisory details

Ottawa, March 30, 2013 – The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and Central-Epicure Food Products Ltd. are warning the public not to consume the Central-Epicure brand Gefilte Fish, Ready to Serve, Sweet and Savoury, described below because they may be contaminated with Clostridium botulinum.Toxins produced by these bacteria may cause botulism, a life-threatening illness.

There have been no reported illnesses associated with the consumption of this product.

The manufacturer, Central-Epicure Food Products Ltd., Toronto, Ontario, is voluntarily recalling the affected product from the marketplace. The CFIA is monitoring the effectiveness of the recall.

Affected products

Brand Name Common Name Size Codes(s) on Product UPC
Central-Epicure Gefilte Fish, Ready to serve, Sweet 600 g Best Before – Up to and including 13AL09 (April 09, 2013) 0 61279 00440 3
Central-Epicure Gefilte Fish, Ready to serve, Savoury 600 g Best Before – Up to and including 13AL09 (April 09, 2013) 0 61279 00442 7

More information

For more information, consumers and industry can contact:

Central- Epicure Food Products Ltd. at foodsafety@centralepicure.com; 

Food contaminated with Clostridium botulinum toxin may not look or smell spoiled. Consumption of food contaminated with the toxin may cause nausea, vomiting, fatigue, dizziness, headache, double vision, dry throat, respiratory failure and paralysis. In severe cases of illness, people may die.

For more information on foodborne pathogens, visit the Causes of Food Poisoning web page.

    • Central-Epicure brand Gefilte Fish

HACCPCanada advocates and mandates HACCP System Certification; with an emphasis on providing Food Safety Confidence to the Consumer. We are a Third-Party Auditor and a Certifying Body (an independent & impartial national organization which evaluates and verifies HACCP systems) and have succeeded in furnishing an economical, effective and expedient Certification Process for the Retail Food Supply Chain including Non-Registered Manufacturing, Warehousing, Logistics, Restaurants and Retail Food Outlets.

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CFIA & PHAC Merge Forces

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Further to an announcement made in April 2012, effective April 1, 2013, some programs of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency’s (CFIA) Office of Biohazard Containment and Safety (OBCS) and the Public Health Agency of Canada’s (PHAC) Pathogen Regulation Directorate (PRD) will be merged. Import permits for terrestrial animal and human pathogens, as well as the certification of laboratories handling these types of pathogens will be offered through a single office located within the PRD at PHAC.

The OBCS at the CFIA will continue to issue permits for:

pathogens causing foreign animal and emerging animal diseases (i.e., pathogens that are not established in or indigenous to Canada);
animals, animal products and by-products, tissue, sera and blood that are infected with animal pathogens;
aquatic animal pathogens; and
plant pathogens.

Additional information on certification and compliance verification for containment facilities, and other information related to the merger, is contained in the attached FAQ.
These changes will also be reflected in the Canadian Biosafety Standards and Guidelines, which will harmonize CFIA and PHAC requirements for biocontainment laboratories handling animal and zoonotic pathogens, as well as pathogens that affect humans only.

The PRD and the OBCS have been working together to achieve program efficiencies for several years. This merger will significantly reduce duplicate regulatory requirements and administrative burden for controlling animal and human pathogens.   This change will enhance the Government of Canada’s capacity and capability to oversee pathogen-related work, without increasing public or animal health risks. The containment regulations and measures designed to protect Canadians and animals from these pathogens and the diseases they cause will continue to be enforced.

Should you have any questions, please contact:

Tianna MacInnes National Manager, Office of Biohazard Containment and Safety, CFIA 613-773-5768tianna.macinnes@inspection.gc.ca   or

Mary Louise Graham Director, Office of Biosafety and Biocontainment Operations, PHAC 613-957-1775Mary.Louise.Graham@phac-aspc.gc.ca

Yours sincerely,

William (Bill) Anderson, Ph.D.A/Associate Vice-President
Science Branch, Canadian Food Inspection Agency
1400 Merivale RoadOttawa, Ontario
K1A 0Y9
Telephone: 613 773-5851
William.Anderson@inspection.gc.ca

Sandra Fry, Director General
Pathogen Regulation Directorate
Emergency Management and Corporate Affairs
Public Health Agency of Canada
100 Colonnade Road Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0K9
Telephone  613 960-6637
Sandra.Fry@phac-aspc.gc.ca

HACCPCanada advocates and mandates HACCP System Certification; with an emphasis on providing Food Safety Confidence to the Consumer. We are a Third-Party Auditor and a Certifying Body (an independent & impartial national organization which evaluates and verifies HACCP systems) and have succeeded in furnishing an economical, effective and expedient Certification Process for the Retail Food Supply Chain including Non-Registered Manufacturing, Warehousing, Logistics, Restaurants and Retail Food Outlets.

Contact us to achieve Certification from HACCPCanada, today!

 

Canada Safeway Ltd Recalls Frozen Beef Burgers

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HACCPCanada advocates and mandates HACCP System Certification; with an emphasis on providing Food Safety Confidence to the Consumer. We are a Third-Party Auditor and a Certifying Body (an independent & impartial national organization which evaluates and verifies HACCP systems) and have succeeded in furnishing an economical, effective and expedient Certification Process for the Retail Food Supply Chain including Non-Registered Manufacturing, Warehousing, Logistics, Restaurants and Retail Food Outlets.

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Certain THE GOURMET MEAT SHOPPE and THE BUTCHER’S CUT brands of Frozen Beef Burgers may contain E. coliO157:H7 bacteria

OTTAWA, February 19, 2013 – The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and Canada Safeway Limited are warning the public not to consume The Gourmet Meat Shoppe and The Butcher’s Cut brands of Frozen Beef Burgers described below because these products may be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7 bacteria.

The following products are affected by this Alert:

Brand Product Size UPC Code
The Gourmet Meat Shoppe Big & Juicy Burger 1.13kg 0 58200 10650 3 BEST BEFORE
2013 AU 14 EST752
The Gourmet Meat Shoppe Prime Rib Burger 907 g 0 58200 10733 3 BEST BEFORE
2013 AU 14 EST752
The Butcher’s Cut Pure Beef Patties
10 Patties
1.13kg 0 58200 21604 2 BEST BEFORE
2013 AU 14 EST752
The Butcher’s Cut Pure Beef Patties
20 Patties
2.27kg 0 58200 21592 2 BEST BEFORE
2013 AU 14 EST752
The Butcher’s Cut Pure Beef Patties
40 Patties
4.45kg 0 58200 21594 6 BEST BEFORE
2013 AU 14 EST752

Big & Juicy Burger
Meat Shoppe Big & Juicy Burger

Prime Rib Burger
Meat Shoppe Prime Rib Burger

Pure Beef Patties - 10 Patties
Pure Beef Patties – 10 Patties

Pure Beef Patties - 20 Patties
Pure Beef Patties – 20 Patties

Pure Beef Patties - 40 Patties
Pure Beef Patties – 40 Patties

These products have been distributed in Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, British Columbia and Northwest Territories. Canada Safeway Limited, Calgary, Alberta, is voluntarily recalling the affected products from the marketplace. The CFIA is monitoring the effectiveness of the recall.

This recall is the result of E. coli O157:H7 product testing by the CFIA related to an ongoing outbreak investigation. The CFIA is currently conducting a food safety investigation at the producing facility to determine if any additional products may be affected.

Food contaminated with E. coli O157:H7 may not look or smell spoiled. Consumption of food contaminated with these bacteria may cause serious and potentially life-threatening illnesses. Symptoms include severe abdominal pain and bloody diarrhoea. Some people may have seizures or strokes and some may need blood transfusions and kidney dialysis. Others may live with permanent kidney damage. In severe cases of illness, people may die.

For more information, consumers and industry can call one of the following numbers:

Canada Safeway Limited at (403) 730-3511;

CFIA at 1-800-442-2342 / TTY 1-800-465-7735 (8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday to Friday).

 

Ottawa Launches Review Into XL Foods E. coli Outbreak

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Panel will report back to Agriculture Canada with recommendations on improving food safety

The Canadian Press/CBC News
Agriculture Canada says an independent panel of experts will review what contributed to the outbreak of E. coli at the XL Foods Inc. plant in Brooks, Alta.Agriculture Canada says an independent panel of experts will review what contributed to the outbreak of E. coli at the XL Foods Inc. plant in Brooks, Alta. (Jeff McIntosh/Canadian Press)

The federal government has launched a review of the E. coli outbreak last fall that sickened 18 people and led to the largest beef recall in Canadian history.

The review is to focus on what contributed to the outbreak of the potentially deadly bacteria at the XL Foods Inc. plant in Brooks, Alta.

It will also look at how well the Canadian Food Inspection Agency performed, including why tainted meat was distributed to retailers and sold to consumers.

XL Foods Recall

Agriculture Canada said the review will be conducted by an independent panel of experts who are to hand in a report with recommendations to improve food safety.

“We take the safety of Canada’s food supply very seriously and we remain committed to the continuous improvement of Canada’s strong food safety systems,” Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz said in a news release Friday evening.

Industry experts

At the time of the E. coli outbreak the XL Foods plant was the largest Canadian-owned beef slaughter facility in the country.

It is now owned and operated by JBS Food Canada, a subsidiary of JBS South America.

The federal government said the review panel includes recognized scientific, public health and meat industry experts.

They include Ronald Lewis, former chief veterinary officer for British Columbia; Dr. Andre Corriveau, chief public health officer for the Northwest Territories; and Ronald Usborne, a former executive with Caravelle Foods.

The review is to look at the design, implementation and oversight of food safety controls at the plant, including CFIA inspection policies, and how well testing information was shared by the company, inspectors and U.S. regulators.

The panel is to review the effectiveness of E. coli prevention protocols, including the ability to detect problems, recall beef products and how well the agency conducted followup investigations.

Federal documents have shown that CFIA inspectors issued six warnings to XL Foods about conditions in the plant between January 2012 and when the plant was temporarily shut down in September.

Some of the problems noted included improper sanitization of equipment, condensation dripping onto beef carcasses and containers overflowing with unsanitary water.

The agency said all of the problems cited were dealt with before the first cases of E. coli were found in beef produced at the plant.

The recall involved millions of tonnes of beef packaged in more than 2,000 different products across Canada and in many U.S. states.

The CFIA restored the plant’s operating licence on Oct. 23 and it was allowed to resume exports of beef products to the United States in December.

 

Salmonella found in Canadian commercial animal feed

CBC News investigation finds salmonella in 2 out of 12 bags

By Joanne Levasseur and Leif Larsen, CBC News

Posted: Dec 19, 2012 4:24 AM CST

Last Updated: Dec 19, 2012 7:39 AM CST

Canadian food inspectors find salmonella in more than 10 per cent of commercial animal feed they test despite a zero tolerance stance, a statistic that has food safety experts alarmed, a CBC News investigation has found.

“We’ve got to do something about the presence of salmonella in the animal feed,” says Rick Holley, a food sciences professor at the University of Manitoba.

“It’s just insane to think we are going to be able to prevent [outbreaks] from happening unless we do something about it.”

Rick Holley of the University of Manitoba says he believes there's a link between salmonella contamination in animal feed and contamination in meat, fruits, vegetables and nuts.

Rick Holley of the University of Manitoba says he believes there’s a link between salmonella contamination in animal feed and contamination in meat, fruits, vegetables and nuts. (CBC) 

 

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) told CBC News it does not accept any amount of salmonella in animal feed, and takes any detection seriously.

However, the agency has confirmed that it finds salmonella in 13 per cent of the feed it routinely tests.

To confirm just how prevalent salmonella in feed is today, CBC News purchased 12 bags of animal feed from retailers around Winnipeg and asked Holley to test samples for salmonella.

Results showed two out of the 12 bags of feed, or about 17 per cent, contained salmonella.

There are, on average, 6,700 cases of salmonella-related illness in Canada each year, according to the Public Health Agency of Canada. These cases result in about 800 hospitalizations and three to five deaths annually.

According to Holley, animals contaminated with salmonella produce contaminated manure, which farmers then spread on fields as fertilizer.

Earlier this month, the CFIA issued a warning about hazelnuts that may be contaminated with salmonella.

Link between animal feed, human food?

Holley said he believes salmonella in animal feed is one of the ways our meat, fruits, vegetables and nuts are becoming contaminated. Other researchers and a CFIA official seem to agree.

“Reducing the potential for animals to be infected with salmonella reduces the potential that those animals will shed the organism and, as a result, contaminate animal-derived foods,” said Paul Mayers, the CFIA’s vice-president of policy and programs.

However, Mayers also said the CFIA takes a “risk-based” approach after it detects salmonella.

CBC News had samples from 12 bags of animal feed tested in Rick Holley's lab in Winnipeg. The feed in two of the bags contained salmonella.

CBC News had samples from 12 bags of animal feed tested in Rick Holley’s lab in Winnipeg. The feed in two of the bags contained salmonella. (CBC)

 

 

“If you have the situation where you have [an animal] that’s not susceptible to salmonella infection, and you have a very low-risk feed, then the corrective action that’s employed may be different than in a [high-risk] situation,” he said.

Mayers said among the most severe corrective actions include product destruction and mandatory CFIA-issued recalls.

He would not indicate what the least severe responses would be, but he said a “corrective action is always required.”

Mayers also declined to give examples of when the CFIA has issued mandatory recalls for salmonella in animal feed.

But one Manitoba feed producer says the CFIA is only concerned with six of the more than 2,500 strains of salmonella, and it lets the feed enter the market normally if it doesn’t detect one of those six strains.

When CBC News shared its testing results with the companies that manufacture the sampled feed, officials with those companies said they were not concerned and would not remove the products from shelves.

Melissa Dumont, director of technical services for the Animal Nutrition Association of Canada (ANAC), which represents feed manufacturers, would not comment directly on the CBC News test results.

However, she said salmonella is “everywhere in the environment…it’s very hard to control, so there’s a possibility that we can find salmonella in [animal] feed.”

When asked about the link between salmonella in feed and human illness, Dumont said she’s not convinced.

“I can only speak of the science that I’ve seen, and right now the link is not evident, if there at all, at this point in time,” she said.

‘I was ready to die’

Lynn McMullen, a professor of microbiology at the University of Alberta, said she was the victim of severe salmonella poisoning.

“I came home from California on a Sunday, and by about 7 o’clock Sunday night, my body was aching. By midnight I couldn’t decide which end of my body should be over a toilet,” she recalled.

McMullen said her doctor initially would not requisition a test for food poisoning, insisting that the problem would take care of itself.

McMullen pushed for the test, which came back positive for salmonella.

Because she was likely exposed while travelling, McMullen was not able to find out how she was infected.

McMullen said salmonella poisoning was one of the worst things she has ever gone through.

“I would never wish this on my worst enemy…I actually was at the point where I was ready to die, it was so bad,” she said.

FDA changes import rules on salmonella

As late as in 2010, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, like the CFIA, enforced a zero-tolerance policy for salmonella in animal feed.

This led to an import alert against four Canadian canola processors in 2009 and 2010, after several shipments of canola meal — a byproduct of the canola oil industry and a popular ingredient in animal feed — tested positive for salmonella.

For more than a year, the FDA effectively shut the U.S.-Canadian border to canola meal from Bunge, Viterra, ADM and Cargill plants in Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Ontario.

Hundreds of shipments were stopped during this period.

But in late 2010 and early 2011, the import alert was lifted after stakeholders petitioned the FDA to relax the way the regulator deals with salmonella in feed.

Robert Broeska, president of the Canadian Oilseed Processors Association, says his group worked with the FDA and other American regulators to narrow the focus of their import restrictions.

As a result, only eight of more than 2,500 strains of salmonella are currently banned from animal feed entering the U.S. These eight strains were singled out for causing sickness in animals.

When asked if salmonella in canola meal could put people at risk, Broeska said he doesn’t think humans consume canola meal directly.

“Canola meal is used for a protein ingredient in livestock feed. So it is really the concern of the feed industry as well as the crushing industry,” he said.

Zero tolerance in Scandinavian nations

Some European countries take the threat of salmonella in the food chain much more seriously than Canada does.

Ola Magnus Loemo, a spokesperson for Norway’s Ministry of Agriculture and Food, says Scandinavian countries “established strong national [salmonella] surveillance-regimes” in the mid-1990s and fought to implement tight controls on salmonella while negotiating European Union treaties.

Loemo said as a result, salmonella outbreaks are very rare in Norway, and “the majority of those cases [almost all] could be traced to contamination abroad.”

Holley said he would like to see Canada take similar steps, and he sees cleaning up our act when it comes to feed as being part of that.

“We can’t possibly hope to reduce the frequency to which these animals that we use as food shed salmonella with the hope that [our food] will not be contaminated unless we stop feeding [salmonella] to our animals,” he said.

 

Loblaw’s Recalls Butcher’s Choice Beef Burgers

Certain BUTCHER’S CHOICE GARLIC PEPPERCORN Beef Burgers may contain E. coli O157:H7 bacteria

OTTAWA, December 12, 2012 – The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and Loblaw Companies Ltd. are warning the public not to consume certain Butcher’s Choice Garlic Peppercorn Beef Burgers because this product may be contaminated with E. coliO157:H7.

The affected product, Butcher’s Choice Garlic Peppercorn Beef Burgers, is sold frozen in 1.13 kg packages bearing UPC 0 60383 89363 7. The affected product bears the code BEST BEFORE 2013 MR 03 EST 752.

This product has been distributed nationally.

This recall is the result of an ongoing investigation into a number of E. coli O157:H7 related illnesses in Canada. The CFIA is currently testing additional products collected from across the country. The recall may be expanded to include other codes or products as test results are received.

Food contaminated with E. coli O157:H7 may not look or smell spoiled. Consumption of food contaminated with this bacteria my cause serious and potentially life-threatening illnesses. Symptoms include severe abdominal pain and bloody diarrhoea. Some people may have seizures or strokes and some may need blood transfusions and kidney dialysis. Others may live with permanent kidney damage. In severe cases of illness, people may die.

Loblaw Companies Ltd., Brampton, Ontario is voluntarily recalling the affected product from the marketplace. The CFIA is monitoring the effectiveness of the recall.

For more information, consumers and industry can call one of the following numbers:

Loblaw Customer Relations at 1-800-296-2332 or customerservice@presidentschoice.ca;

Public Relations Department, Loblaw Companies Limited at (905) 459-2500 or pr@loblaw.ca;

CFIA at 1-800-442-2342 / TTY 1-800-465-7735 (8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday to Friday).